arise

verb
\ ə-ˈrīz How to pronounce arise (audio) \
arose\ ə-​ˈrōz How to pronounce arise (audio) \; arisen\ ə-​ˈri-​zᵊn How to pronounce arise (audio) \; arising\ ə-​ˈrī-​ziŋ How to pronounce arise (audio) \

Definition of arise

intransitive verb

1a : to begin to occur or to exist : to come into being or to attention Problems arise when people try to avoid responsibility. A conflict arose because of a misunderstanding. Questions have arisen concerning the company's financial records. He can defend himself should the need arise. [=if it becomes necessary to do so]
b : to originate from a source arteries that arise from the aorta a river that arises from two main sources
2 : to get up or stand up : rise He arose from his chair. especially : to get up from sleep or after lying down He arose (from bed) refreshed after a good night's sleep.
3 : to move upward : ascend A mist arose from the valley.

Synonyms & Antonyms for arise

Synonyms

Antonyms

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spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of arise in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web New spectacles worth fictionalizing will arise, but when the current wave crests, could giving those stories the glossy TV treatment come to feel like a hackneyed way to address serious matters? Matthew Jacobs, Town & Country, 22 Apr. 2022 Complicated tax questions can arise at the point at which a state’s unique tax regulations meet the specific details of how a certain company does business. Forbes, 14 Apr. 2022 Overuse injuries in particular (like shin splints) can arise when your fitness routine lacks rest days. Sara Coughlin, SELF, 29 Mar. 2022 But here, too, issues can arise, which is why Frost Giant Games has no plans to use cryptocurrency for tournaments. Matthew Smith, Wired, 15 Mar. 2022 Problems may arise when teaching falls somewhere in the middle of those two premises. John Schandelmeier, Anchorage Daily News, 12 Mar. 2022 Challenges also arise when internal pain points in need of solving are not actually suited to AI in terms of accuracy, speed and/or scale. David Drai, Forbes, 3 May 2022 In reality, clashes regularly arise between different rights and between different rights-holders. New York Times, 3 May 2022 As with many of the other symptoms of celiac disease, these issues arise because of malnutrition. Eleesha Lockett, SELF, 3 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'arise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of arise

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for arise

Middle English, from Old English ārīsan, from ā-, perfective prefix + rīsan to rise — more at abide

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Time Traveler for arise

Time Traveler

The first known use of arise was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near arise

Arisaka

arise

arisings

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Statistics for arise

Last Updated

18 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Arise.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/arise. Accessed 23 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for arise

arise

verb
\ ə-ˈrīz How to pronounce arise (audio) \
arose\ -​ˈrōz \; arisen\ -​ˈri-​zᵊn \; arising\ -​ˈrī-​ziŋ \

Kids Definition of arise

1 : to move upward Mist arose from the valley.
2 : to get up from sleep or after lying down
3 : to come into existence A dispute arose.

More from Merriam-Webster on arise

Nglish: Translation of arise for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of arise for Arabic Speakers

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