all

adjective
\ ˈȯl How to pronounce all (audio) \

Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : the whole amount, quantity, or extent of needed all the courage they had sat up all night
b : as much as possible spoke in all seriousness
2 : every member or individual component of all men will go all five children were present
3 : the whole number or sum of all the angles of a triangle are equal to two right angles
4 : every all manner of hardship
5 : any whatever beyond all doubt
6 : nothing but : only all work and no play :
a : completely taken up with, given to, or absorbed by became all attention
b : having or seeming to have (some physical feature) in conspicuous excess or prominence all legs
c : paying full attention with all ears
7 dialect : used up : entirely consumed used especially of food and drink
8 : being more than one person or thing I don't know who all is coming.
all the
: as much of … as : as much of a … as all the home I ever had

all

adverb

Definition of all (Entry 2 of 4)

1a : wholly, quite sat all alone often used as an intensive all out of proportionall over the yardit wasn't all that funny
b : selected as the best (as at a sport) within an area or organization used in combination all-league halfback
2 obsolete : only, exclusively
3 archaic : just
4 : so much all the better for it
5 : for each side : apiece the score is two all

Definition of all (Entry 3 of 4)

1a : the whole number, quantity, or amount : totality all that I have all of us all of the books
b used in such phrases as for all I know, for all I care, and for all the good it does to indicate a lack of knowledge, interest, or effectiveness
2 : everybody, everything gave equal attention to all that is all
all in all
: on the whole : generally all in all, things might have been worse
and all
: and everything else especially of a kind suggested by a previous context cards to fill out with … numbers and all— Sally Quinn

all

noun

Definition of all (Entry 4 of 4)

: the whole of one's possessions, resources, or energy gave his all for the cause

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Synonyms & Antonyms for all

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Adverb

Synonyms: Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Adverb

Antonyms: Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

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Choose the Right Synonym for all

Adjective

whole, entire, total, all mean including everything or everyone without exception. whole implies that nothing has been omitted, ignored, abated, or taken away. read the whole book entire may suggest a state of completeness or perfection to which nothing can be added. the entire population was wiped out total implies that everything has been counted, weighed, measured, or considered. the total number of people present all may equal whole, entire, or total. all proceeds go to charity

Examples of all in a Sentence

Adjective I've been waiting all week to see her. He had to walk all the way home. She works all year round. He'll need all the help he can get. Someone took all the candy. Adverb She has traveled all around the world. This money will be all yours when I die. She had buttons all down the side of her dress. I forgot all about paying the bill. The kids got all excited when they saw Santa Claus.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The new pavilion would be built in the same spot on the northeast side of the lake with a large vendor hall, all-gender bathroom, performance nook and steps leading into the water. Susan Du, Star Tribune, 12 May 2021 By then, all-metal designs were the standard for the major components of aircraft, which provided lots of benefits but one big one: easy maintenance. Walter J. Boyne And Alex Hollings, Popular Mechanics, 23 May 2021 Bringing in a 24-year-old, all-world talent from North Chelmsford, and showing him how Bergeron and Marchand operate (see: Hall, Taylor), could be ideal. BostonGlobe.com, 15 May 2021 She's led all-women climbing teams across the world, written extensively about being a female in a predominantly male sport and wants to be a role model for young girls looking to explore the outdoors. Ben Church, CNN, 28 Oct. 2020 Bid farewell to your all-black winter ensembles, readers! Emily Dixon, Marie Claire, 2 Apr. 2021 His all-time winning record as a head coach: 225-107. Gordon Monson, The Salt Lake Tribune, 27 Mar. 2021 But soon the all-caps were flying from inside Walter Reed. Mary Mcnamara Culture Columnist And Critic, Los Angeles Times, 11 Nov. 2020 In general, hot sleepers should avoid all-memory foam mattresses, which tend to retain more heat. Jessica Bennett, Better Homes & Gardens, 5 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb Bo Nix didn’t have a great game, but his final line wasn’t all on him. Tom Green | Tgreen@al.com, al, 10 Oct. 2021 His admirable qualities — an uncluttered directness, effortless virtuosity and a devotion to the composer’s intention — were all apparent. Christian Hertzog, San Diego Union-Tribune, 10 Oct. 2021 So much of it today is focused on the IP that's generated, and the theme parks are all part of consumer products. Laura Parker, Forbes, 8 Oct. 2021 Experts say the wind, waves and tides are all factors that can affect the movement of the slick, which is a thin layer that sits on the surface of the ocean. Los Angeles Times, 6 Oct. 2021 Hartford Big Read events were all virtual, but this year there are live concerts and activities as well as online offerings. Christopher Arnott, courant.com, 6 Oct. 2021 But in the narrow calculations of the Senate minority leader, that would all be Biden's fault -- and would likely further wound an already-wobbling presidency. Stephen Collinson, CNN, 5 Oct. 2021 The premium package is just one of the company's many offerings that are all easily giftable. Rachel Chang, Travel + Leisure, 5 Oct. 2021 Before his final drive, Lance had completed 2 of 7 passes for 87 yards, which included a 76-yard scoring toss to Samuel, who was all alone because of a busted coverage. Eric Branch, San Francisco Chronicle, 5 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Botox may not be the cure-all for your own excessive sweating, however. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, 6 Sep. 2021 The money in the budget, in other words, is allocated to do specific things—it’s not just some free-for-all with taxpayer money. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, 15 Sep. 2021 There are enough real-life crises in this brisk, often laugh-out-loud tell-all to light the imagination of any cable TV script writer. Washington Post, 19 Aug. 2021 His boss at Les Halles, Philippe Lajaunie, recalls learning that his executive chef had written a salty tell-all about the restaurant industry only around the time Kitchen Confidential hit the best-seller list. Alison Willmore, Vulture, 16 July 2021 While relative calm reigned over the capital, in sharp contrast to the free-for-all at the airport, many residents hid in their homes or ventured out only cautiously to see what life might be like under their new rulers. New York Times, 24 Aug. 2021 But in 1998 the DNR went public with a statewide plan for OHV which for the vast amount of our public lands became a free-for-all for OHVs and triggered a quasi-rebellion by the people in north-central Minnesota known as the Jack Pine Coalition. Star Tribune, 1 Aug. 2021 Spanning months and aesthetics—swimwear and coats often sharing the catwalk—resort collections were the catch-all for many brands, featuring items destined to sell because of the season’s long shelf life and arrival during the holidays. Steff Yotka, Vogue, 20 July 2021 There is opposition to Medicare-for-all from both the Democratic and Republican parties. Drake Bentley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 25 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'all.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of all

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1593, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for all

Adjective

Middle English al, all, alle, going back to Old English eall (West Saxon), all (Anglian), going back to Germanic *alla- (whence also Old Frisian al, alle "the whole of," Old Saxon all, Old High German al, all, Old Norse allr, Gothic alls), probably going back to *al-no- or *ol-no-, derivative of a base *ala-/*ola- seen in compounds (as Old English ælmihtig almighty entry 1, Old Saxon alohwīt "completely white," Old High German alawāri "quite true," Gothic alabrunsts "burnt offering," calque of Greek holokaútōma), of uncertain origin

Note: Both the correct repertoire of comparable forms and a valid Indo-European reconstruction have been subjects of dispute. Perhaps directly comparable to Germanic *ol-no- is Welsh oll, holl "the whole, all" (with h- of secondary origin); the same base might be present in Old Irish uile "all, every," if going back to *ol-i̯o-. (Old Irish oll "great, ample" is probably not related.) Outside of Germanic and Celtic other comparisons have been suggested, as Oscan allo "whole, entire" and Lithuanian aliái (in aliái víenas "all, everyone"). As an Indo-European reconstruction, Kroonen (Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic) proposes *h2el-nó- for Germanic and *h2ol-i̯o- for Old Irish uile, though the assumption of ablaut seems arbitrary. Whatever the ultimate origin, an etymon restricted to western (European) Indo-European.

Adverb

Middle English al, all, going back to Old English all, representing adverbial uses of the quantifier all entry 1

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

Middle English al, all, going back to Old English all, pronominal use of the quantifier all entry 1

Noun

nominal use of the pronoun all entry 3

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Time Traveler for all

Time Traveler

The first known use of all was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near all

alkynyl

all

all' ottava

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Statistics for all

Cite this Entry

“All.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/all. Accessed 21 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for all

all

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: the whole, entire, total amount, quantity, or extent of
: every member or part of
: the whole number or sum of

all

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of all (Entry 2 of 3)

: entirely or completely
: for each side or player

all

pronoun

English Language Learners Definition of all (Entry 3 of 3)

: the entire number, quantity, or amount
: the only thing

all

adjective
\ ˈȯl How to pronounce all (audio) \

Kids Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : every one of All students can go.
2 : the whole of He sat up all night.
3 : the whole number of after all these years
4 : any whatever beyond all doubt
5 : the greatest possible Her story was told in all seriousness.

all

adverb

Kids Definition of all (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : completely He sat all alone. I'm all finished.
2 : so much He is all the better for being put in another class.
3 : very entry 2 sense 1 The child was all excited.
4 : for each side The score is two all.

all

pronoun

Kids Definition of all (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : the whole number or amount I ate all of the candy.
2 : everything All is lost.
3 : the only thing All I know is I'm done.

ALL

abbreviation

Medical Definition of ALL

acute lymphoblastic leukemia; acute lymphocytic leukemia

More from Merriam-Webster on all

Nglish: Translation of all for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of all for Arabic Speakers

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