affliction

noun
af·​flic·​tion | \ ə-ˈflik-shən How to pronounce affliction (audio) \

Definition of affliction

1 : a cause of persistent pain or distress a mysterious affliction
2 : great suffering felt empathy with their affliction
3 : the state of being afflicted by something that causes suffering her affliction with polio

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Examples of affliction in a Sentence

She lost her sight and is now learning to live with her affliction. He died from a mysterious affliction.
Recent Examples on the Web For 99 days, Sault made affliction sound cheeky, like a sneering vote of confidence written in invisible ink. Will Dukes, Rolling Stone, 9 Oct. 2021 What can explain the astonishing rise and spread of this affliction? Jill Lepore, The New Yorker, 17 May 2021 Although the nonprofit group views its findings as an illustration of chickens being raised with little concern for their welfare, the affliction also can curtail the nutritional value of poultry when consumed by humans. Kate Gibson, CBS News, 20 Sep. 2021 The affliction appears to affect many young birds including blue jays, hawks, robins, grackles and starlings. Cori Brown, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, 1 Aug. 2021 But the current mystery affliction includes neurological effects not seen with house finch eye disease. Christin Nance Lazerus, chicagotribune.com, 2 July 2021 Debate has raged about whether digital addiction is a real affliction or something akin to a strong habit. Scott Nover, Quartz, 23 June 2021 The opioid epidemic has long been painted as a rural white affliction, but the demographics have been shifting for years as deaths surged among Black Americans. Chronicle Staff, San Francisco Chronicle, 27 June 2021 The portrait of the opioid epidemic has long been painted as a rural white affliction, but the demographics have been shifting for years as deaths surged among Black Americans. Fox News, 24 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'affliction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of affliction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

History and Etymology for affliction

Middle English affliccioun "misery, distress, self-inflicted pain," borrowed from Anglo-French afflicion, borrowed from Late Latin afflīctiōn-, afflīctiō, from Latin afflīgere "to afflict" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of action nouns

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Time Traveler for affliction

Time Traveler

The first known use of affliction was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near affliction

afflictedness

affliction

afflictive

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Statistics for affliction

Last Updated

18 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Affliction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/affliction. Accessed 20 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for affliction

affliction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of affliction

: something (such as a disease) that causes pain or suffering
: the state of being affected by something that causes suffering

affliction

noun
af·​flic·​tion | \ ə-ˈflik-shən How to pronounce affliction (audio) \

Kids Definition of affliction

1 : the state of being affected by something that causes pain or unhappiness his affliction with polio
2 : something that causes pain or unhappiness Chicken pox is an affliction caused by a virus.

More from Merriam-Webster on affliction

Nglish: Translation of affliction for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of affliction for Arabic Speakers

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