treatise

noun
trea·​tise | \ ˈtrē-təs also -təz How to pronounce treatise (audio) \

Definition of treatise

1 : a systematic exposition or argument in writing including a methodical discussion of the facts and principles involved and conclusions reached a treatise on higher education
2 obsolete : account, tale

Examples of treatise in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

To me, this book felt like a treatise on the power of words. Rachel Epstein, Marie Claire, "Elizabeth Gilbert's 'City of Girls' Lives Up to the Hype," 1 Aug. 2019 Among them was Heaven’s Breath: A Natural History of the Wind (New York Review Books Classics, $18.95), a Reagan-era pop-sci bestseller that reads like a lost Renaissance treatise. Julian Lucas, Harper's magazine, "New Books," 22 July 2019 Like many monumental works of 15th-century printing, Pacioli’s treatise has survived in its original form. The Economist, "A revolutionary treatise goes on the block," 6 June 2019 Émigré scholars and nativist autodidacts met secretly in rural museums and published samizdat treatises filled with runic letters and outlandish ethnological hypotheses. Jacob Mikanowski, Harper's magazine, "The Call of the Drums," 21 July 2019 Romney released lengthy treatises and delivered major addresses to think tanks. Noah Bierman, latimes.com, "‘Great’ again: To win in 2020, Trump sticks with what worked," 12 July 2019 This astronomical treatise was then widely distributed, making visual access to the moon’s surface available to some for the first time in history. Shannon Stirone, New York Times, "Imagining the Moon," 9 July 2019 In 1883, when the Kamasutra first made its appearance in English, European readers of Vatsyayana’s treatise hadn’t the faintest idea that its publisher—the wordily nomenclatured Hindoo Kama Shastra Society—was, in fact, an entirely nonexistent body. Manu S Pillai, Quartz India, "When a British official dodged Victorian prudery to publish the Kamasutra in English," 27 June 2019 The wine list was virtually a treatise on natural wines, a long document full of the names of eccentric producers and obscure European villages. New York Times, "A Stand-Up Example of Sit-Down Pizza," 4 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'treatise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of treatise

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for treatise

Middle English tretis, from Anglo-French tretiz, alteration of tretez, traitet, from Medieval Latin tractatus, from Latin tractare to treat, handle

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18 Aug 2019

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The first known use of treatise was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for treatise

treatise

noun

English Language Learners Definition of treatise

: a book, article, etc., that discusses a subject carefully and thoroughly

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Britannica English: Translation of treatise for Arabic Speakers

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