testament

noun

tes·​ta·​ment ˈte-stə-mənt How to pronounce testament (audio)
1
a
: a tangible proof or tribute
b
: an expression of conviction : creed
2
a
: an act by which a person determines the disposition of his or her property after death
b
: will
3
a
capitalized : either of two main divisions of the Bible
b
archaic : a covenant between God and the human race
testamentary adjective

Example Sentences

The success of the album, which is only available online, is a testament to the power of the Internet. a person's last will and testament
Recent Examples on the Web That the song hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Rock Digital Song Sales chart in October is testament to its generational pull. Melissa Ruggieri, USA TODAY, 30 Nov. 2022 Viola’s primary success was testament to the strength of that voting bloc, echoed in the electoral achievements of Councilmembers-elect Eunisses Hernandez and Soto-Martinez. Los Angeles Times, 17 Nov. 2022 Every one of his films, from his best to his worst, is testament not only to his technical skill but his rock-solid belief that, spliced together in the right order, a string of moving pictures can change your life. Bill Goodykoontz, The Arizona Republic, 15 Nov. 2022 The line of people hoping to get into the Opry House, extending across a couple of nearby parking lots, was testament to that, as were the tears from minute one inside the house. Chris Willman, Variety, 2 Nov. 2022 But for them, the swift attention is just a testament to people missing the type of songs that defined R&B girl groups in the ’90s and early 2000s. Deasia Page, Harper's BAZAAR, 11 Oct. 2022 The match was also testament to the power of youthful energy and low mileage knees. Jason Gay, WSJ, 8 Sep. 2022 My own journey with endometriosis is testament to that. Lucia Osborne-crowley, refinery29.com, 26 July 2022 That question is testament to how comfortable and prepared Tuimoloau looked as a freshman despite not even committing until early July. Nathan Baird, cleveland, 23 July 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'testament.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin testamentum covenant with God, holy scripture, from Latin, last will, from testari to be a witness, call to witness, make a will, from testis witness; akin to Latin tres three & to Latin stare to stand; from the witness's standing by as a third party in a litigation — more at three, stand

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3b

Time Traveler
The first known use of testament was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near testament

Cite this Entry

“Testament.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/testament. Accessed 9 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

testament

noun
tes·​ta·​ment ˈtes-tə-mənt How to pronounce testament (audio)
1
capitalized : either of the two chief parts of the Bible
2
a
: actual proof : evidence
the result is testament to her determination and hard work
b
: an expression of belief : creed
3
: the legal instructions for the distribution of a person's belongings after death : will
testamentary adjective

Legal Definition

testament

noun
tes·​ta·​ment ˈtes-tə-mənt How to pronounce testament (audio)
1
: an act by which a person determines the disposition of his or her property after death
a testament of property
2
: will

Note: A testament was formerly concerned specifically with personal property, as in the phrase last will and testament. Now a will covers both personal and real property and the terms will and testament are generally synonymous, but the phrase lives on.

testamentary adjective

History and Etymology for testament

Latin testamentum, from testari to call as a witness, make a will, from testis witness

More from Merriam-Webster on testament

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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