reproach

noun
re·​proach | \ ri-ˈprōch How to pronounce reproach (audio) \

Definition of reproach

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an expression of rebuke or disapproval
2 : the act or action of reproaching or disapproving was beyond reproach
3a : a cause or occasion of blame, discredit, or disgrace
4 obsolete : one subjected to censure or scorn

reproach

verb
re·​proach | \ ri-ˈprōch How to pronounce reproach (audio) \
reproached; reproaching; reproaches

Definition of reproach (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to express disappointment in or displeasure with (a person) for conduct that is blameworthy or in need of amendment
2 : to make (something) a matter of reproach
3 : to bring into discredit

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Other Words from reproach

Noun

reproachful \ ri-​ˈprōch-​fəl How to pronounce reproachful (audio) \ adjective
reproachfully \ ri-​ˈprōch-​fə-​lē How to pronounce reproachfully (audio) \ adverb
reproachfulness noun

Verb

reproachable \ ri-​ˈprō-​chə-​bəl How to pronounce reproachable (audio) \ adjective
reproacher noun
reproachingly \ ri-​ˈprō-​chiŋ-​lē How to pronounce reproachingly (audio) \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for reproach

Verb

reprove, rebuke, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide mean to criticize adversely. reprove implies an often kindly intent to correct a fault. gently reproved my table manners rebuke suggests a sharp or stern reproof. the papal letter rebuked dissenting clerics reprimand implies a severe, formal, often public or official rebuke. reprimanded by the ethics committee admonish suggests earnest or friendly warning and counsel. admonished by my parents to control expenses reproach and chide suggest displeasure or disappointment expressed in mild reproof or scolding. reproached him for tardiness chided by their mother for untidiness

Examples of reproach in a Sentence

Noun

A bug in the logic of a design, though discovered and fixed in the lab, stands as a slight reproach to the designer. — Tracy Kidder, The Soul of a New Machine, 1981 Yes, he told them, when he came, it was quite true that they would have to pay interest. And then Teta Elzbieta broke forth into protestations and reproaches, so that the people outside stopped and peered in at the window. — Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, 1906 "He's the finest boy in England," the father said in a tone of reproach to her, "and you don't seem to care for him, Becky, as much as you do for your spaniel.  … " — William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, 1847 She looked at him with reproach. Accusations and reproaches from both parties made it difficult to pursue discussions. His conduct has brought shame and reproach to his family.

Verb

Parents and teachers gaped at the young writers, uncertain whether to reproach or praise these young adults for their language in writing about decidedly adult issues. — Tobi Jacobi, English Journal, March 2007 For years I fretted over these questions and reproached myself for not having taken that diary when it was offered to me in 1945. — John Hope Franklin, Race and History, 1989 She did not reproach herself with her failure; but she would have been happier if there had been less discrepancy between her words to Sophy Viner and the act which had followed them. — Edith Wharton, The Reef, 1912 our neighbor loudly reproached us for tromping through his yard she cleared her throat as a way of reproaching us for having our elbows on the table
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Because of his punk past, Alejandro Escovedo has hard-rocking bona fides beyond reproach. Houston Chronicle, "The Must List: Q-Fest, The Try Guys, Alejandro Escovedo," 18 July 2019 Decisions must be made in a manner which is above reproach and displays integrity and openness. San Diego Union-Tribune, "HOA Homefront: Transparency – Great for windows (HOA boards too)," 29 June 2019 Scottish columnists bombarded the Spanish government with reproaches. Neal Ascherson, The New York Review of Books, "The Value of Independence," 18 Apr. 2019 That reproach supposes the existence of a distant, neutral way of writing. Robert O. Paxton, The New York Review of Books, "Novels as History," 7 Feb. 2019 Zdeno Chara, 42 years old and playing with a broken jaw, is beyond reproach. Chad Finn, BostonGlobe.com, "The losses still pack a wallop," 13 June 2019 By Tuesday, the Aquarius affair had erupted into full-blown sniping among allies, as four European governments traded mutual recriminations, reproaches and comeuppances. Adam Nossiter, New York Times, "Scorned Migrant Boat Exposes Raw Feelings Among European Allies," 13 June 2018 Defendants admit as much, conceding that several of ORR’s vetting practices have no empirical foundation, but are rather self-serving hedges against political reproach. Edvard Pettersson, Bloomberg.com, "‘Irrational’ Child-Detention Process Leaves Minors in Custody," 25 June 2018 Regarding this situation, these lines particularly stand out: • City employees must conduct business of the City impartially and in a manner above reproach, with preferential treatment for none. Jason Williams, Cincinnati.com, "PX column: Jeff Pastor's mansion gift looks awful. Can Cincinnati citizens trust him?," 2 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Truffaut sharply reproached established French filmmakers for complaining about pressure from producers or from official censors. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, "The Truffaut Essays That Clear Up Misguided Notions of Auteurism," 8 June 2019 According to Marca, Ramos immediately reacted to Ronaldo’s actions by reproaching the Portuguese for his actions, having deemed his comments to be inappropriate during such a time for the club. SI.com, "Sergio Ramos Makes Feelings Clear to Cristiano Ronaldo After Star's Shock Comments on Madrid Future," 30 May 2018 And the incident also displays his reluctance to reproach his fans, however nasty their behavior. Ed Kilgore, Daily Intelligencer, "Trump Responds to Roseanne Saga by Whining About His Own Treatment by ABC," 30 May 2018 Rather than blaming gun owners for mass shootings, Mr. Cox said, Americans should reproach the institutions of government and law enforcement that fail to stop such killings. Alexander Burns, New York Times, "Renewing Bond With the N.R.A., Trump Appeals for Help in the Midterms," 4 May 2018 Longtime hyper-involved volunteer Suzanne (Lisa Anne Porter, bouncing up and down with the enthusiasm of Richard Simmons) is equally vehement in bulldozing her views over everyone else’s and then reproaching herself for doing so. Lily Janiak, San Francisco Chronicle, "Aurora’s ‘Eureka Day’ goes from ‘so Berkeley’ to universal," 22 Apr. 2018 His daughter Luiza, now in her late 30s and living in Spain, reproached him for being absent from her life for the last 20 years. Kit Gillet, New York Times, "Being Dead, He Learned, Is Hard to Overcome," 30 Mar. 2018 Gibson, 75, would reproach Shapiro, 74, for being more shocked and offended by what happened to Gibson than Gibson was. Chris Kaltenbach, baltimoresun.com, "Two old friends share stories of erasing racial lines in Baltimore," 12 Mar. 2018 You can’t be reproached for your inaction, but you’re right to wonder whether more could have been done. Kwame Anthony Appiah, New York Times, "Can I Use My Dad’s Connections to Get an Internship?," 21 Feb. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reproach.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reproach

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for reproach

Noun and Verb

Middle English reproche, from Anglo-French, from reprocher to reproach, from Vulgar Latin *repropiare to bring close, show, from Latin re- + prope near — more at approach

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Statistics for reproach

Last Updated

22 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for reproach

The first known use of reproach was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for reproach

reproach

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reproach

formal : to speak in an angry and critical way to (someone) : to express disapproval or disappointment to (someone)

reproach

verb
re·​proach | \ ri-ˈprōch How to pronounce reproach (audio) \
reproached; reproaching

Kids Definition of reproach

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to find fault with : blame I reproached him for such selfishness.

reproach

noun

Kids Definition of reproach (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that deserves blame or disgrace
2 : an expression of disapproval

Other Words from reproach

reproachful \ -​fəl \ adjective
reproachfully \ -​fə-​lē \ adverb

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More from Merriam-Webster on reproach

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with reproach

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for reproach

Spanish Central: Translation of reproach

Nglish: Translation of reproach for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of reproach for Arabic Speakers

Comments on reproach

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