proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) , prə-\
proclaimed; proclaiming; proclaims

Definition of proclaim

transitive verb

1a : to declare publicly, typically insistently, proudly, or defiantly and in either speech or writing : announce
b : to give outward indication of : show his manner proclaimed his genteel upbringing
2 : to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty proclaim the country a republic
3 : to praise or glorify openly or publicly : extol proclaimed the rescue workers' efforts

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Other Words from proclaim

proclaimer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for proclaim

declare, announce, proclaim, promulgate mean to make known publicly. declare implies explicitness and usually formality in making known. the referee declared the contest a draw announce implies the declaration of something for the first time. announced their engagement at a party proclaim implies declaring clearly, forcefully, and authoritatively. the president proclaimed a national day of mourning promulgate implies the proclaiming of a dogma, doctrine, or law. promulgated an edict of religious toleration

Did You Know?

The pro- in proclaim means "forward, out", so a proclamation is an "outward" statement intended for the public. We often think of proclamations as something issued by monarchs or dictators, but Lincoln was able to issue his Emancipation Proclamation because as president he had the power to free the slaves in certain areas. At a slightly lower level, a governor may proclaim a day in honor of the state's firemen, a movie critic may proclaim a director to be the best of all, or you may proclaim your New Year's resolutions to a crowd of friends.

Examples of proclaim in a Sentence

She proclaimed that she will run for governor. The President proclaimed a national day of mourning. He took command of the government and proclaimed himself emperor. The magazine proclaimed him to be the best player in baseball. He proclaimed his love for her in a poem. His behavior proclaimed his good upbringing.
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Recent Examples on the Web

On January 1, 1804, Jean-Jacques Dessalines proclaimed the island of Saint-Domingue free and independent from French rule after a successful revolution. Danielle Pointdujour, Essence, "Ayiti Chérie! 37 Times Travelers Showed Haiti Nothing But Love," 31 July 2019 Before its closing, The Enquirer’s food writer Polly Campbell proclaimed the Frenchie Fresh burger her favorite. Sheila Vilvens, Cincinnati.com, "Chef Jean-Robert drops a delicious video featuring location for new Frenchie Fresh," 22 July 2019 His attorney, Norm Pattis, proclaimed his client's innocence after the hearing Tuesday. Fox News, "Fox News legal analyst: Investigators need to find Jennifer Dulos' body to make their case," 12 June 2019 In response, many churches and synagogues proclaimed themselves sanctuary sites. Mario Garcia, The Conversation, "More Central American migrants take shelter in churches, recalling 1980s sanctuary movement," 30 July 2019 The Republic of Minerva’s founders showed no signs of backing off, so in June of 1972, the King of Tonga proclaimed that the reefs were part of his country and planted a Tongan flag on the reef. Diana Budds, Curbed, "This failed utopia from the 1970s sparked an international dispute," 12 July 2019 Engineers and technicians in the spacecraft’s control room near Tokyo could be seen erupting into cheers and applause on a YouTube live stream when project manager Yuichi Tsuda proclaimed the operation a success just before 11 a.m. local time. Dennis Normile, Science | AAAS, "In a first, a Japanese spacecraft appears to have collected samples from inside an asteroid," 11 July 2019 Today, the province is one of the most populous in the country and a key part of Xi’s fight against poverty, as proclaimed by red banners across acres of peanut farms and oil fields. Yanan Wang, The Seattle Times, "‘We must pay so dearly’: China’s churches raided, silenced," 7 Aug. 2018 As a wise man once proclaimed, Chelsea's biggest problem right now is their ailing midfield, so why not take a chance on the one time English Xavi, even if that one time was seven years ago. SI.com, "Why Chelsea Should Take a Punt on Super Jack Wilshere and Make Him the Golden Boy He Deserves to Be," 22 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'proclaim.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of proclaim

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for proclaim

Middle English proclamen, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from pro- before + clamare to cry out — more at pro-, claim

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Statistics for proclaim

Last Updated

20 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for proclaim

The first known use of proclaim was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for proclaim

proclaim

verb

English Language Learners Definition of proclaim

: to say or state (something) in a public, official, or definite way : to declare or announce (something)
formal : to show (something) clearly

proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \
proclaimed; proclaiming

Kids Definition of proclaim

: to announce publicly : declare The president proclaimed a holiday.

proclaim

transitive verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \

Legal Definition of proclaim

: to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty

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More from Merriam-Webster on proclaim

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for proclaim

Spanish Central: Translation of proclaim

Nglish: Translation of proclaim for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of proclaim for Arabic Speakers

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