inculcate

verb
in·​cul·​cate | \ in-ˈkəl-ˌkāt How to pronounce inculcate (audio) , ˈin-(ˌ) How to pronounce inculcate (audio) \
inculcated; inculcating

Definition of inculcate

transitive verb

: to teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions

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Other Words from inculcate

inculcation \ ˌin-​(ˌ)kəl-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce inculcation (audio) \ noun
inculcator \ in-​ˈkəl-​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce inculcator (audio) , ˈin-​(ˌ)kəl-​ \ noun

Synonyms for inculcate

Synonyms

endue (or indue), imbue, infuse, ingrain (also engrain), inoculate, invest, steep, suffuse

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implant, inculcate, instill, inseminate, infix mean to introduce into the mind. implant implies teaching that makes for permanence of what is taught. implanted a love of reading in her students inculcate implies persistent or repeated efforts to impress on the mind. tried to inculcate in him high moral standards instill stresses gradual, gentle imparting of knowledge over a long period of time. instill traditional values in your children inseminate applies to a sowing of ideas in many minds so that they spread through a class or nation. inseminated an unquestioning faith in technology infix stresses firmly inculcating a habit of thought. infixed a chronic cynicism

Did You Know?

Inculcate derives from the past participle of the Latin verb inculcare, meaning "to tread on." In Latin, "inculcare" possesses both literal and figurative meanings, referring to either the act of walking over something or to that of impressing something upon the mind, often by way of steady repetition. It is the figurative sense that survives with "inculcate," which was first used in English in the 16th century. "Inculcare" was formed in Latin by combining the prefix in- with calcare, meaning "to trample," and ultimately derives from the noun calx, meaning "heel." In normal usage "inculcate" is typically followed by the prepositions "in" or "into," with the object of the preposition being the person or thing receiving the instruction.

Examples of inculcate in a Sentence

The teacher inculcated in her students the importance of good study habits. dedicated teachers inculcating young minds with a love of learning

Recent Examples on the Web

The notion that Macbeth could apply his military skill to deposing the king is something that Macbeth’s wife is eager to inculcate. Mike Giuliano, baltimoresun.com, "Outdoor production of 'Macbeth' in Ellicott City casts its spell," 13 June 2019 With ever-evolving cyber threats, digital literacy is a must-have skill that parents must acquire and inculcate in their kids. Sangeeta Tanwar, Quartz India, "Urban Indian parents are more sure about their kids’ online safety than their own," 6 June 2019 Parents would begin this process of moral training, and teachers would continue it from kindergarten onward, following a curriculum that inculcates the Categorical Imperative and analyzes situations in light of its two formulations. Paula Marantz Cohen, WSJ, "Kant in Kindergarten Could Ease the Civility Crisis," 28 Dec. 2018 Rather, colleges and universities inculcate the practices and spirit of the tribalism that disfigures American politics. Peter Berkowitz, WSJ, "Conservatism and Populism Go Back Centuries," 6 Nov. 2018 But the greatest challenge may be the need to inculcate character. New York Times, "What’s the Biggest Challenge for Colleges and Universities?," 5 June 2018 If democratic systems inculcate pro-democratic values in their citizens, as political scientists generally believe, then these countries should show higher support for democracy than autocratic countries. Christopher Claassen, Washington Post, "Support for democracy is declining — but not in the U.S. or other Western democracies," 5 July 2018 While its foreign policy has enabled it to generate an impressive base of national power, Beijing has been unable to inculcate a distinct vision within a network of alliances. Ali Wyne, The New Republic, "Is America Choosing Decline?," 21 June 2018 Some behaviors have just kinda inculcated themselves into the collective unconsciousness. Lee Hutchinson, Ars Technica, "Video: We force kids to confront ’80s technology," 24 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inculcate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inculcate

1539, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for inculcate

Latin inculcatus, past participle of inculcare, literally, to tread on, from in- + calcare to trample, from calc-, calx heel

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Statistics for inculcate

Last Updated

21 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for inculcate

The first known use of inculcate was in 1539

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More Definitions for inculcate

inculcate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of inculcate

formal : to cause (something) to be learned by (someone) by repeating it again and again

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