faith

noun
\ ˈfāth How to pronounce faith (audio) \
plural faiths\ ˈfāths How to pronounce faiths (audio) , sometimes  ˈfāt͟hz \

Definition of faith

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : allegiance to duty or a person : loyalty lost faith in the company's president
b(1) : fidelity to one's promises
(2) : sincerity of intentions acted in good faith
2a(1) : belief and trust in and loyalty to God
(2) : belief in the traditional doctrines of a religion
b(1) : firm belief in something for which there is no proof clinging to the faith that her missing son would one day return
(2) : complete trust
3 : something that is believed especially with strong conviction especially : a system of religious beliefs the Protestant faith
on faith
: without question took everything he said on faith

faith

verb
\ ˈfāth How to pronounce faith (audio) \
faithed; faithing; faiths

Definition of faith (Entry 2 of 2)

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Synonyms & Antonyms for faith

Synonyms: Noun

devotion, piety, religion

Antonyms: Noun

atheism, godlessness

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Choose the Right Synonym for faith

Noun

belief, faith, credence, credit mean assent to the truth of something offered for acceptance. belief may or may not imply certitude in the believer. my belief that I had caught all the errors faith almost always implies certitude even where there is no evidence or proof. an unshakable faith in God credence suggests intellectual assent without implying anything about grounds for assent. a theory now given credence by scientists credit may imply assent on grounds other than direct proof. gave full credit to the statement of a reputable witness

Examples of faith in a Sentence

Noun

Faith without doubt leads to moral arrogance, the eternal pratfall of the religiously convinced. — Joe Klein, Time, 17 May 2004 Nick wiped at the moustache of sweat droplets that was as much a part of his face as his eyes and nose and gave a shrug that indicated a certain lack of faith in our judgment. — Tom Perrotta, Joe College, 2000 But while no one with a grain of sense trusted Miss Stephanie, Jem and I had considerable faith in Miss Maudie. She had never told on us, had never played cat-and-mouse with us, she was not at all interested in our private lives. She was our friend. — Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, 1960 His supporters have accepted his claims with blind faith. Our faith in the government has been badly shaken by the recent scandals. Lending him the money to start his own business was an act of faith. It requires a giant leap of faith for us to believe that she is telling the truth. Nothing is more important to her than her faith in God. She says that her faith has given her the courage to deal with this tragedy.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Landlords have evicted Muslims because of their faith. The Economist, "Sri Lanka responds to Islamist terrorism by terrorising Muslims," 6 June 2019 The twins have long credited their close bond, along with the support of their parents and their faith, for their success. Iliana Limón Romero, orlandosentinel.com, "Former UCF stars Shaquill, Shaquem Griffin featured in new book," 4 June 2019 Finally, there’s Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who has emphasized faith and family values in his surprise-breakout run. Chloe Angyal, Marie Claire, "Where Male Presidential Candidates Stand on Reproductive Rights," 9 May 2019 Chip and Joanna have admitted to their differences in the past, and even fans of the series have seen the serious designer and goofy contractor clash, but the couple relies on their faith and connection to stay close. Sara Rodrigues, House Beautiful, "Chip and Joanna Gaineses' Love Story Is Better Than The Notebook," 19 Apr. 2019 Joe put his deep faith and love of God into practice through his personal relationships and many activities. courant.com, "Joseph James Sullivan," 12 July 2018 The creators wanted to universalize the story for audiences of all faiths and backgrounds. Joseph Berger, New York Times, "How Do You Say ‘Tradition’ in Yiddish?," 11 July 2018 Fido, the dog under the table, is a symbol of faith and fidelity as well as a beloved family pet. Victoria Dalkey, sacbee, "Crocker showcases diversity of Eduardo Carrillo's work, from realism to myth and fantasy," 6 July 2018 Judge eventually recounted their good-faith effort in his 2011 memoir, Waltzing with Brando: Planning a Paradise in Tahiti. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "Billy Zane Will Play Marlon Brando in Stranger than Fiction Biopic Waltzing with Brando," 14 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'faith.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of faith

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for faith

Noun

Middle English feith, fei, borrowed from Anglo-French feit, feid, fei, going back to Latin fidēs "trust, guarantee, proof, sincerity, loyalty, belief," going back to *bhid-ēi-, noun derivative from zero-grade of an Indo-European verbal base *bhei̯dh- "entrust, trust," whence Latin fīdere "to trust (in), have confidence (in)," fīdus "faithful," Greek peíthesthai "to obey, comply with, believe," peíthein "to persuade, prevail upon," Albanian be "oath," and probably Old Church Slavic běždǫ, běditi "to compel, constrain," běda "distress, need"

Note: The English word is an early loan from medieval French, first attested in a homily fragment from the 12th century (see feþ in Dictionary of Old English); it appears to preserve the final interdental fricative generally lost in early Old French—a loss reflected in the more common Anglo-French form fei (also loaned into Middle English—see fay entry 2). Indo-European *bhei̯dh- is also usually claimed to be the source of Germanic *bīðan- "to wait" (see bide).

Verb

verbal derivative of faith entry 1

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Learn More about faith

Dictionary Entries near faith

fais-dodo

fait

fait accompli

faith

faith cure

faither

faithful

Statistics for faith

Last Updated

11 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for faith

The first known use of faith was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for faith

faith

noun

English Language Learners Definition of faith

: strong belief or trust in someone or something
: belief in the existence of God : strong religious feelings or beliefs
: a system of religious beliefs

faith

noun
\ ˈfāth How to pronounce faith (audio) \

Kids Definition of faith

1 : strong belief or trust I have faith in our leaders.
2 : belief in God
3 : a system of religious beliefs : religion people of all faiths
4 : loyalty to duty or to a person or thing The team's true fans keep the faith.

faith

noun

Legal Definition of faith

1a : allegiance or loyalty to a duty or a person
b : sincerity or honesty of intentions — see also bad faith, good faith
2 : fidelity to one's promises and obligations

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More from Merriam-Webster on faith

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with faith

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for faith

Spanish Central: Translation of faith

Nglish: Translation of faith for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of faith for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about faith

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