drag

noun
\ ˈdrag How to pronounce drag (audio) \

Definition of drag

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : something used to drag (see drag entry 2) with especially : a device for dragging under water to detect or obtain objects
2 : something that is dragged, pulled, or drawn along or over a surface: such as
a agriculture : harrow
b : a sledge (see sledge entry 3 sense 2) for conveying heavy bodies
3a : the act or an instance of dragging or drawing: such as
(1) : a drawing along or over a surface with effort or pressure
(2) : motion effected with slowness or difficulty also : the condition of having or seeming to have such motion
(3) : a draw on a pipe, cigarette, or cigar took a drag on his cigar also : a draft (see draft entry 1 sense 2b) of liquid
b : a movement, inclination, or retardation caused by or as if by dragging the drag of his bottom lip
c slang : influence securing special favor : pull
4a : something that retards or impedes motion, action, or advancement
b(1) physics : the retarding force acting on a body (such as an airplane) moving through a fluid (such as air) parallel and opposite to the direction of motion
(2) mechanical engineering : friction (see friction sense 1b) between engine parts also : retardation due to friction
c : burden, encumbrance the drag of population growth on living standards
d : one that is boring or gets in the way of enjoyment thinks studying is a drag this sickly kid is going to be a social drag— Edmund Morris
5 hunting
a : an object drawn over the ground to leave a scented trail
b : a clog (see clog entry 1 sense 1a) fastened to a trap to prevent the escape of a trapped animal
6 : street, road the main drag
7a : entertainment in which performers dressed as members of the opposite sex caricature gender stereotypes through the use of often outrageous costumes and exaggerated mannerisms often used before another nouna drag show
b(1) : stereotypically gendered clothing or costume worn by someone of the opposite sex often used in the phrase in dragMy kind of TV show featured cartoons, puppets or Milton Berle in drag.— Dennis Drabelle
(2) : costume What was perhaps most embarrassing about Cyrus' dismal gig was its cutesy toys—a giant teddy bear from which she popped to cavort with a dance troupe in fuzzy bear drag.— Camille Paglia especially : a costume used to impersonate a person or kind of person … Paul Newman and Robert Redford romping about in bad-guy drag like naughty Hardy Boys ain't my idea of a western. — Mark Goodman
8 sports : drag race

drag

verb
dragged; dragging

Definition of drag (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a(1) : to draw or pull slowly or heavily : haul dragging a box down the hall
(2) : to cause to move with slowness or difficulty dragged myself up the stairs dragging his feet
(3) : to cause to trail (see trail entry 1 sense 1a) along a surface wandered off dragging the leash
b(1) : to bring by or as if by force or compulsion had to drag her husband to the opera
(2) : to extract by or as if by pulling drag the truth out of him
c : protract drag a story out
2a : to pass a drag over drag a field
b : to explore with a drag drag the pond for the drowning victim
c hunting and fishing : to catch with a dragnet (see dragnet sense 1)
3 baseball : to hit (a drag bunt) while moving toward first base
4 computers : to select and move (an item on a computer screen) by using a mouse, a touch screen, etc. drag the icon to the bottom row

intransitive verb

1 : to hang or lag behind Stop dragging and hurry up.
2 : to fish or search with a drag (see drag entry 1 sense 1)
3 : to trail along on the ground Your scarf is dragging.
4a : to move slowly because of fatigue was dragging after the long trip
b : to proceed or continue laboriously or tediously The lawsuit dragged on for years.
5 : draw sense 4a drag on a cigarette
6 : to make a plucking or pulling movement
7 sports : to participate in a drag race
drag one's feet or less commonly drag one's heels
: to act in a deliberately slow or dilatory manner

Definition of drag (Entry 3 of 3)

: of, being, involving, or intended for a person wearing clothing typical of the opposite sex : of, being, involving, or intended for a person in drag (see drag entry 1 sense 7b(1)) a drag ball

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Other Words from drag

Verb

draggingly \ ˈdra-​giŋ-​lē How to pronounce draggingly (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for drag

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of drag in a Sentence

Noun My parents can be such a drag. They won't let me do anything. These meetings are a total drag. Let me have a drag from your cigarette. He took a long drag on the cigarette. Verb She dragged one of the other tables over to ours. Firefighters dragged the man to safety. One of the parents eventually dragged the screaming toddler out of the store. The broken muffler dragged behind the car. The dog's leash was dragging along the ground. The child is always dragging his blanket. The puppy ran up to us, dragging her leash behind her. He dragged himself up the stairs and climbed into bed. Can you drag yourself away from that computer?
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Since then, the country was forced to give up a port complex to China, and its debt crisis has been a serious drag on the economy, along with a collapse in tourism since the bombings. Dharisha Bastians, New York Times, "In Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election, a Question of Security vs. Rights," 16 Nov. 2019 The scrapping of so many events is a further drag on tourism numbers, which are sharply down in recent months because of the unrest. Will Davies, Fortune, "From Airline Conferences to Tattoo Conventions, Everything’s Being Canceled in Hong Kong," 14 Nov. 2019 But the strike seven months ago by 31,000 Stop & Shop workers continues to be a drag. Stephen Singer, courant.com, "Stop & Shop parent company: Impact of April strike still stings as some customers who drifted to competitors stayed away," 6 Nov. 2019 Part of the report’s goal, its authors wrote, was to combat any narratives which regard Latinos as a drag on the economy. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Latino economy is strong and growing, study says," 26 Sep. 2019 Even so, there are signs that Brexit uncertainty has been a drag on economic growth: Gross domestic product increased 1.4% last year, the slowest rate since 2011, according to European Banking Federation data. John Detrixhe, Quartz, "Despite Brexit, the UK is even more dominant in currency trading," 16 Sep. 2019 More than half of the public comments from companies surveyed by ISM pointed to economic uncertainty as a drag on their businesses. CBS News, "Stock markets drop on news that U.S. manufacturing is shrinking," 3 Sep. 2019 Getting ready to go back to school doesn't have to be a total drag. Teen Vogue, "19 Trendy Backpacks for the 2019 School Year," 5 Aug. 2019 High employee turnover can be very costly, and also a drag on productivity and employee engagement. Tom Cooney And Crystal Faulkner, Cincinnati.com, "BusinessWise: Recognition is key to great company culture," 19 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The president just about dragged Gov. Matt Bevin across the finish line, helping him run stronger than expected in what turned into a very close race at the end,’’ Brad Parscale said. BostonGlobe.com, "Democrats took full control of the Virginia legislature for the first time in more than two decades while the race for governor in deeply Republican Kentucky was too close to call despite a last-minute boost from President Donald Trump.," 6 Nov. 2019 Daniels dragged the tree behind him with the best of intentions, but here came the guys. Dana Hunsinger Benbow, Indianapolis Star, "Hands-on Mitch Daniels helps revive Purdue athletics: 'I just want to win'," 31 Oct. 2019 He was approved to attend outpatient mental health treatment while his criminal case drags on in court. AZCentral.com, "Police shootings in Arizona," 22 Oct. 2019 This meltwater, naturally light, drags warm Atlantic water up along Helheim’s face. Paul Voosen, Science Magazine, "A project to monitor every aspect of a fast-shrinking glacier could hold an answer to an urgent question: How fast will seas rise?," 10 Oct. 2019 Plus, your work boots probably drag in dust and pollen. Paige Szmodis, Popular Mechanics, "Ward off Allergens With This Winix Air Purifier, 50% off on Amazon Today," 8 Oct. 2019 But the longer the hearings drag, the greater the amount of power generated at the wind farms that would be lost. Kuwar Singh, Quartz India, "How wind power developers are losing out to red tape in India," 7 Oct. 2019 But little progress has been made, and both sides accuse each other of dragging their feet. San Diego Union-Tribune, "EU makes appeal to US: let’s avoid another tariff war," 2 Oct. 2019 Kaplan's ruling eliminated a potential shortcut for the NCAA and will no doubt drag out an investigation that already promised to be long and tedious. Danielle Lerner, The Courier-Journal, "A judge just made the NCAA's investigation into Louisville basketball more difficult," 4 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective She's been working on drag magazine VELOUR and has continued to produce her show Nightgowns, which showcases a diverse array of drag performances in Brooklyn. John Paul Brammer, Teen Vogue, "Sasha Velour Gives an Intimate Look at the Making of "Pirate Jenny" and Talks Pushing Drag Into New Directions," 4 May 2018 The sunny skies were great and 70-degree temps were perfect, but a flag-snapping crosswind made the drag track sensitive to navigate for those not in tune with the conditions. Elton Alexander, cleveland.com, "NHRA Norwalk 2017: Steve Torrence gets fourth triumph at Summit Racing Equipment Nationals," 25 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'drag.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of drag

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a(1)

Adjective

1887, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for drag

Noun, Verb, and Adjective

Middle English dragge, probably from Middle Low German draggen grapnel; akin to Old English dragan to draw — more at draw

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Time Traveler for drag

Time Traveler

The first known use of drag was in the 14th century

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Statistics for drag

Last Updated

22 Nov 2019

Cite this Entry

“Drag.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/draggingly?pronunciation&lang=en_us&dir=d&file=drag0002. Accessed 5 December 2019.

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More Definitions for drag

drag

noun
How to pronounce drag (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of drag

 (Entry 1 of 2)

informal : someone or something that is boring, annoying, or disappointing
informal : someone or something that makes action or progress slower or more difficult
informal : the act of breathing in smoke from a cigarette, cigar, pipe, etc.

drag

verb

English Language Learners Definition of drag (Entry 2 of 2)

: to pull (someone or something that is heavy or difficult to move)
: to move along the ground, floor, etc., while being pulled
: to cause (something) to move along the ground, floor, etc., by pulling it

drag

noun
\ ˈdrag How to pronounce drag (audio) \

Kids Definition of drag

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something used for pulling along (as a device used underwater to catch something)
2 : something without wheels (as a heavy sled for carrying loads) that is pulled along or over a surface
3 : something that slows down motion He never forgot to put on the drag as we went downhill …— Anne Sewell, Black Beauty
4 : a dull or unpleasant event, person, or thing

drag

verb
dragged; dragging

Kids Definition of drag (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to pull slowly or heavily I dragged over a chair.
2 : to move with slowness or difficulty She dragged herself out of bed.
3 : to move or cause to move along on the ground You're dragging your scarf. Your scarf is dragging.
4 : to bring by or as if by force He dragged us to the store.
5 : to pass or cause to pass slowly The day dragged.
6 : to hang or lag behind Quit dragging—walk faster.
7 : to search or fish by pulling something (as a net) under water

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More from Merriam-Webster on drag

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for drag

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with drag

Spanish Central: Translation of drag

Nglish: Translation of drag for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of drag for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about drag

Comments on drag

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