dare

verb
\ ˈder How to pronounce dare (audio) \
dared; daring; dares or (auxiliary) dare

Definition of dare

 (Entry 1 of 4)

auxiliary verb

: to be sufficiently courageous to no one dared say a word she dare not let herself love— G. B. Shaw

intransitive verb

: to have sufficient courage try it if you dare

transitive verb

1a : to challenge to perform an action especially as a proof of courage dared him to jump
b : to confront boldly : defy dared the anger of his family
2 : to have the courage to contend against, venture, or try the actress dared a new interpretation of the classic role

dare

noun

Definition of dare (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : an act or instance of daring (see dare entry 1 sense 1) : challenge crossed the river on a dare refused to take the dare
2 : imaginative or vivacious boldness : daring

Definition of DARE (Entry 3 of 4)

Dictionary of American Regional English

Dare

biographical name
\ ˈder How to pronounce Dare (audio) \

Definition of Dare (Entry 4 of 4)

Virginia 1587–? 1st child born in America of English parents

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Other Words from dare

Verb

darer \ ˈder-​ər How to pronounce darer (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for dare

Synonyms: Verb

challenge, defy, stump

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Examples of dare in a Sentence

Verb

Try it if you dare. We wanted to laugh but didn't dare. The actress dared a new interpretation of the classic role. She dared him to dive off the bridge. She dared me to ask him out on a date. I did, and he said yes.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Over his next two games, Williams did not fire up any long jumpers that defenses were daring him to take. Adam Himmelsbach, BostonGlobe.com, "Gifted Celtic Robert Williams remains a work in progress," 12 July 2019 Most come to party late into the night before watching hundreds test their speed and daring against the bulls each morning. NBC News, "One gored, 5 more hurt in running of bulls during San Fermin festival in Pamplona," 11 July 2019 Most come to party late into the night before watching hundreds test their speed and daring against the bulls each morning. Jayme Deerwester, USA TODAY, "Pamplona veterans protest running of the bulls as too safe, despite numerous injuries," 11 July 2019 Is there any 2019 major summer film that demonstrates any real risk, surprise or daring? Todd Mccarthy, The Hollywood Reporter, "Critic's Notebook: Summer 2019's Sad, Stale State of the Movies," 8 July 2019 Some Americans have sworn off watching the team, given that players have dared to infuse politics into their conversations, and actions. Sean Gregory, Time, "The World Cup Final Is the U.S. Women's Soccer Team's Chance to Silence Critics – Trump and Otherwise – Forever," 5 July 2019 Inspired to be brave, to dare, to let your imagination finally connect with your inner self and then rest. Steff Yotka, Vogue, "How Adriana Hot Couture Brought Her Radical Style to Milanese Pride," 3 July 2019 The man’s daring Thanksgiving Eve crime in 1971 remains the only unsolved skyjacking in U.S. history. oregonlive.com, "D.B. Cooper search leads to Bachelor Island; ex-FBI agent says suspect will get away with it ‘unless he confesses’," 27 June 2019 That demographic fact may be why an otherwise hyper-political and often unhinged California state government apparently does not dare rename, remodel, or close down the touristy missions. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "The Cowardly Incoherence of Name-Changing, Statue-Toppling, and other Iconoclasms," 25 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Sam, from Sydney’s north shore, fell ill from the slug dare and was taken to Royal North Shore Hospital, where he was diagnosed as having been infected with rat lungworm. Fox News, "Teen disabled on a dare after swallowing slug leans on family, friends," 2 Apr. 2018 As What/If is Zellweger’s first episodic show, the whole shoot felt like her own personal dare—a rehearsal nut shooting a pilot before the series finale had even been written. Amy Nicholson, Town & Country, "What/If Made Renée Zellweger "Uncomfortable" And She Loved It," 24 May 2019 The Problem With Random Growth Sheffield and Miller began collaborating thanks to a kind of dare. Quanta Magazine, "A Unified Theory of Randomness," 2 Aug. 2016 But on a dare, she and a friend ventured into the shed and painted each wasp with a different identifying dot of paint, the standard preparation for studying the social dynamics of an insect colony. Quanta Magazine, "The Woman Who Stared at Wasps," 5 Nov. 2015 When that dare got old, Shields simply started carrying the gold medal with her and flashed it to her skeptics. Dan Gelston, The Seattle Times, "Shields wants to lift women’s boxing into mainstream," 12 Apr. 2019 The truths were just as wild as the dares and these actors were more than ready to play. Allie Gemmill, Teen Vogue, ""On My Block" Stars Play Teen Vogue's "I Dare You"," 5 Apr. 2019 The Australian had swallowed a live slug on a dare back then. Eleanor Hildebrandt, Popular Mechanics, "How Parasites Can Lie Dormant for Years Before Killing You," 6 Nov. 2018 Inevitably, these types of conversations are awkward and mostly avoid where even the brave dare not go. WSJ, "The Father-Son Talk in the Age of #MeToo," 30 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dare

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense

Noun

1594, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for dare

Verb and Noun

Middle English dar (1st & 3rd singular present indicative), from Old English dear; akin to Old High German gitar (1st & 3rd singular present indicative) dare, Greek tharsos courage

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Learn More about dare

Dictionary Entries near dare

Dardani

Dardanian

Dardic

dare

DARE

Dare

daredevil

Statistics for dare

Last Updated

16 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for dare

The first known use of dare was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for dare

dare

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to have enough courage or confidence to do something : to not be too afraid to do something
: to do (something that is difficult or that people are usually afraid to do)
: to tell (someone) to do something especially as a way of showing courage

dare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of dare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of telling someone to do something as a way of showing courage

dare

verb
\ ˈder How to pronounce dare (audio) \
dared; daring

Kids Definition of dare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to have courage enough for some purpose : be bold enough Try it if you dare. sometimes used as a helping verb The knight looked so solemn about it that Alice did not dare to laugh.— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass
2 : to challenge to do something especially as a proof of courage I dare you to jump.
3 : to face with courage They dared the dangerous crossing.

dare

noun

Kids Definition of dare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a challenge to do something as proof of courage I ate the hot pepper on a dare.

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More from Merriam-Webster on dare

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with dare

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for dare

Spanish Central: Translation of dare

Nglish: Translation of dare for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of dare for Arabic Speakers

Comments on dare

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