concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , ˈkän-ˌkrēt, kən-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : naming a real thing or class of things the word poem is concrete, poetry is abstract
2 : formed by coalition of particles into one solid mass
3a : characterized by or belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
b : specific, particular a concrete proposal
c : real, tangible concrete evidence
4 : relating to or made of concrete a concrete wall

concrete

verb
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \
concreted; concreting

Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to form into a solid mass : solidify
2 : to make actual or real : cause to take on the qualities of reality
3 : to cover with, form of, or set in concrete The statues were concreted to the ground.

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt \

Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass formed by concretion or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body
2 : a hard strong building material made by mixing a cementing material (such as portland cement) and a mineral aggregate (such as sand and gravel) with sufficient water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass
3 : a waxy essence of flowers prepared by extraction and evaporation and used in perfumery

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Other Words from concrete

Adjective

concretely adverb
concreteness noun

Did You Know?

Adjective

We can trace "concrete" back to the Latin verb concrescere, meaning "to grow together." Appropriately, when if first entered English "concrete" could mean "connected by growth." Logicians and grammarians also applied "concrete" to words that expressed a quality viewed as being united with the thing it describes. That in turn led to the sense of "concrete" which we now contrast with "abstract" - concrete words express actual things ("rock," "lizard, "harpsichord"), while abstract words express qualities apart from actual things ("bliss," "freedom," "turpitude"). It was not until the 19th century that the noun "concrete," and its related adjective, began to be used for the building material composed of cementing material and sand, gravel, or similar materials.

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

Adjective It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. We hope the meetings will produce concrete results. Verb the mortar slowly concreted in the mold a choral work that concretes music and dance into a stunning theatrical experience
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective And block by concrete block, the front lines were drawn between the Tierpark and the Berlin Zoo. Time, "Even Before the Wall, Berlin's Zoos Were Already Cold War Rivals," 12 Nov. 2019 There was a concrete-block church there with a gold statue of a saint. Amanda Petrusich, The New Yorker, "Joni Mitchell Discusses Her New Book of Early Songs and Drawings," 16 Oct. 2019 The fugitive's car was stuck on a concrete parking block. NBC News, "Frank had always wanted to be a police officer. Everything changed when he shot a man in the line of duty.," 6 Oct. 2019 Inside the no-frills, concrete-block building along Morena Boulevard, the conversations are relished, not rushed. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: San Diego fly-fishing haven Stroud Tackle reminds us of unrushed yesterdays," 27 Sep. 2019 The cedar-and-concrete-block residence the world’s most famous architect designed for Evelyn and Conrad Gordon was based on his spare, functional Usonian principles. oregonlive, "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oregon house and others are all over this new map," 23 Sep. 2019 Even if world leaders take concrete steps to reduce carbon emissions, everyone on the planet is going to be confronting tough consequences for decades to come. David Wild, The Conversation, "Data science could help Californians battle future wildfires," 12 Nov. 2019 That’s because when natural gas, gel, electricity, or propane feeds into the unit, fire will emit from precise gaps in the artificial logs—which are usually concrete or ceramic, Galinsky notes. Kelly Dawson, House Beautiful, "What to Know About Ventless Fireplaces," 29 Oct. 2019 The kitchen island is concrete, and the floors are made from antique timber flooring—the use of rich materials contrasted with the white walls makes the space very tactile. Lucia Tonelli, ELLE Decor, "At Home With Chrissie Rucker, Founder of the White Company," 24 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The location will also serve local brews and frozen custard concretes with mix-ins by Chicago bakeries like Hot Chocolate Bakery and Bang Bang Pie. Grace Wong, chicagotribune.com, "Hemingway-inspired Spanish tapas restaurant opens in Logan Square, plus more Chicago restaurant news," 17 Oct. 2019 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Elena Becatoros, The Seattle Times, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Washington Post, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Now some shafts have been rebuilt and lined with concrete. Ian James, azcentral, "Ancient aqueducts in Oman imperiled by modern wells and climate change," 28 Nov. 2019 The concrete was at least five feet deep in some places, so digging was no easy task. Sharon Coolidge, Cincinnati.com, "'We will do whatever we can': Inside the search for the man buried in building collapse," 27 Nov. 2019 More and more of the island is covered with concrete. Timothy O'grady, Condé Nast Traveler, "For the Real Santorini, Visit During Off-Season," 15 Nov. 2019 Sixty-five percent live in countries where individuals have been attacked or killed for their online activities — individuals like the two Thai anti-government activists whose bodies were found stuffed with concrete in the Mekong Riverlast December. The Washington Post, Twin Cities, "Other voices: The internet gets less free — for the ninth year in a row," 7 Nov. 2019 The body was found wrapped in blankets and stuffed inside a 250-gallon water tank that was then filled with concrete and covered with wood. Chris Harris, PEOPLE.com, "Model Found Encased in Concrete Was Injected With Pool Cleaner, as Suspect Pleads Not Guilty," 6 Nov. 2019 In Brisbane, protesters chained themselves to intersections in the city center and three people locked themselves onto barrels filled with concrete. Tristan Lavalette, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Climate activists block roads, protest in Australian cities," 8 Oct. 2019 But don’t do what so many attempt: don’t fill it with concrete. Neil Sperry, ExpressNews.com, "Hollow, goop-filled tree needs an arborist’s advice," 30 Aug. 2019 Buildings, though, seem to draw the special ire of those who believe that commerce itself, as commerce might be responsible for steel and glass and concrete, is responsible for these horrendous losses. Joe Soucheray, Twin Cities, "Soucheray: For that kind of money, you might expect more bird deaths," 16 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concrete.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concrete

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concrete

Adjective

Middle English concret "(of words) denoting a quality as adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," borrowed from Medieval Latin concrētus "composite, solidified, (of words) denoting a quality adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," going back to Latin, "formed, composite, condensed, solid," from past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Verb

borrowed from Latin concrētus, past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Noun

derivative of concrete entry 1

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Time Traveler for concrete

Time Traveler

The first known use of concrete was in the 14th century

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Statistics for concrete

Last Updated

4 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Concrete.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concrete?src=search-dict-box. Accessed 14 December 2019.

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More Definitions for concrete

concrete

adjective
How to pronounce concrete (audio) How to pronounce concrete (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: made of concrete
: relating to or involving specific people, things, or actions rather than general ideas or qualities

concrete

verb
How to pronounce concrete (audio) How to pronounce concrete (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

British : to cover or form (something) with concrete

concrete

noun
How to pronounce concrete (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

: a hard, strong material that is used for building and made by mixing cement, sand, and broken rocks with water

concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made of or relating to concrete
2 : being specific and useful a concrete example
3 : being real and useful concrete evidence

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hardened mixture of cement, sand, and water with gravel or broken stone used in construction

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