burnout

noun
burn·​out | \ ˈbərn-ˌau̇t How to pronounce burnout (audio) \

Definition of burnout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the cessation of operation usually of a jet or rocket engine also : the point at which burnout occurs
2a : exhaustion of physical or emotional strength or motivation usually as a result of prolonged stress or frustration
b : a person suffering from burnout
3 : a person showing the effects of drug abuse

burn out

verb
burned out or burnt out; burning out; burns out

Definition of burn out (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to drive out or destroy the property of by fire
2 : to cause to fail, wear out, or become exhausted especially from overwork or overuse

intransitive verb

: to suffer burnout

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Examples of burnout in a Sentence

Noun Teaching can be very stressful, and many teachers eventually suffer burnout. the burnout rate among teachers a novel about academic burnouts Verb working 12-hour days at that job just burned me out
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun And yet, health-care workers, many of whom are already experiencing burnout and the emotional toll of witnessing COVID ravage their patients, haven’t backed down. Allyson Chiu, Anchorage Daily News, "These doctors and nurses battle COVID all day - then they go online and fight misinformation," 24 Feb. 2021 And yet, health-care workers, many of whom are already experiencing burnout and the emotional toll of witnessing covid ravage their patients, haven’t backed down. Allyson Chiu, Washington Post, "These doctors and nurses battle covid all day. Then they go online and fight misinformation.," 24 Feb. 2021 Spencer said that while his hospital never felt the strain of having to care for too many patients than the hospital’s capacity would allow, staffing shortages were frequent because of burnout and illness. Cassidy Morrison, Washington Examiner, "COVID ICU nurse among the majority of fellow staff who have endured the disease," 4 Feb. 2021 But the culture of the industry remains mired in the idea that putting in long hours is a mark of quality and dedication, rather than burnout and inefficiency. Sarah Jaffe, Wired, "The Rise of One of the First Video Game Workers Unions," 26 Jan. 2021 The study, published in August in the British Medical Journal Quality & Safety, found that nurses with higher workloads were more likely to report poorer safety conditions, burnout and plans to leave their jobs within a year. Melanie Evans, WSJ, "Covid-19 Surge Leaves Doctors, Nurses Reeling From Burnout," 25 Jan. 2021 Physician burnout and the financial strain on primary care practices as patient volumes drop during the pandemic may lead to the loss of tens of thousands of primary care physicians—and there was already a shortage before the pandemic began. Anna Goshua, Scientific American, "The Pandemic Is Delaying Cancer Screenings and Detection," 24 Dec. 2020 It’s grueling and hazardous work with a high potential for burnout. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, "Turning music lessons into ‘trauma informed care’ for frontline health care workers," 7 Jan. 2021 About 1 in 5 faculty members at the U reported high levels of burnout since the start of the pandemic, according to a research study surveying more than 1,000 faculty. Ryan Faircloth, Star Tribune, "Minnesota students, professors say college during pandemic was 'not a lot of fun'," 26 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The Prius has long been a favorite target locally and nationally because their engines don't run as much, meaning the precious metals inside take longer to burn out. Tim Harlow, Star Tribune, "Catalytic converters are at the center of a Twin Cities crime wave," 19 Feb. 2021 In sparsely populated places where people adhere to social distancing guidelines, fewer people would have to be vaccinated to burn out the virus. Emily Baumgaertner, Anchorage Daily News, "Can COVID-19 vaccines get us to herd immunity? ‘The jury is definitely still out’," 27 Dec. 2020 In sparsely populated places where people adhere to social distancing guidelines, fewer people would have to be vaccinated to burn out the virus. Emily Baumgaertner, Anchorage Daily News, "Can COVID-19 vaccines get us to herd immunity? ‘The jury is definitely still out’," 27 Dec. 2020 Essentially, your brain will burn out and affect your ability to exercise. Nancy Clanton, ajc, "5 health mistakes to avoid repeating in 2021," 31 Dec. 2020 In sparsely populated places where people adhere to social distancing guidelines, fewer people would have to be vaccinated to burn out the virus. Emily Baumgaertner, Anchorage Daily News, "Can COVID-19 vaccines get us to herd immunity? ‘The jury is definitely still out’," 27 Dec. 2020 Pellman’s performance is just right on that front (as are the brief appearances by Tracey Ullman and Mary Kay Place) — let the craziness burn out, and do the right thing, and maybe things will work out in the end. Bill Goodykoontz, Detroit Free Press, "Don’t be fooled by Netflix’s promising invitation to ‘The Prom’," 11 Dec. 2020 Pellman’s performance is just right on that front (as are the brief appearances by Tracey Ullman and Mary Kay Place) — let the craziness burn out, and do the right thing, and maybe things will work out in the end. Bill Goodykoontz, The Arizona Republic, "Meryl Streep and Nicole Kidman shine in 'The Prom' on Netflix. James Corden, not so much," 8 Dec. 2020 With hurricane force wind gusts, fires can quickly burn out of control. Jeff Berardelli, CBS News, "Hurricane force gusts prompt extremely critical fire danger in California," 24 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'burnout.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of burnout

Noun

1940, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1710, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

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Time Traveler for burnout

Time Traveler

The first known use of burnout was in 1710

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Statistics for burnout

Last Updated

27 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Burnout.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/burnout. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for burnout

burnout

noun

English Language Learners Definition of burnout

: the condition of someone who has become very physically and emotionally tired after doing a difficult job for a long time
: a person who suffers burnout
: the time when a jet or rocket engine stops working because there is no more fuel available

burnout

noun
burn·​out | \ ˈbərn-ˌau̇t How to pronounce burnout (audio) \

Medical Definition of burnout

1a : exhaustion of physical or emotional strength usually as a result of prolonged stress or frustration
b : a person affected with burnout
2 : a person showing the effects of drug abuse

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