adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

: to make an official decision about who is right in (a dispute) : to settle judicially The school board will adjudicate claims made against teachers.

intransitive verb

: to act as judge The court can adjudicate on this dispute.

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Other Words from adjudicate

adjudicative \ -​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce adjudicative (audio) , -​kə-​ \ adjective
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun
adjudicatory \ -​ˈjü-​di-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adjudicatory (audio) \ adjective

Did You Know?

Adjudicate is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Adjudicate is from the Latin verb adjudicare, from judicare, meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun judex, meaning "judge." English has other judex words, such as judgment, judicial, judiciary, and prejudice. If we admit further evidence, we discover that the root of judex is jus, the word for "law." What's the verdict? Latin law words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms. In addition to the judex words, jury, justice, injury, and perjury are all ultimately from Latin jus.

Examples of adjudicate in a Sentence

The board will adjudicate claims made against teachers. The case was adjudicated in the state courts. The board will adjudicate when claims are made against teachers.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The ninth, which is the longest article, laid out Congress’ powers, which were few: to declare war, to adjudicate interstate disputes, to coin money; each power required the agreement of nine states. Thomas Wendel, National Review, "The Beginning of a Nation," 4 July 2019 Expanding the program to more ports of entry along the border, Reichlin-Melnick added, will require more courts and judges to adjudicate more asylum cases. CBS News, "Trump's plan to deter migrants with "Remain in Mexico" faces logistical and legal hurdles," 14 June 2019 China is creating its own courts to adjudicate commercial disputes with foreigners (see Chaguan). The Economist, "America is deploying a new economic arsenal to assert its power," 6 June 2019 But the two other cases, which have been adjudicated, are sealed; a judge denied The Arizona Republic's request to view the outcome of those cases. Uriel J. Garcia, azcentral, "Civil suit claims Hamilton High coach knew about sexual abuse between players," 16 May 2018 But Donnelly asked whether others being prevented from entering the country might face harm if returned to their home countries before the legality of the ban could be adjudicated. Wesley Lowery, Washington Post, "Early chaos of Trump’s travel ban set stage for a year of immigration policy debates," 6 Feb. 2018 The existing case took a year to adjudicate at trial, and another five months from the initial ruling to Thursday’s SCOTUS decision. Dara Lind, Vox, "The Supreme Court’s census ruling, explained," 27 June 2019 Some parents who don’t pass will be allowed to remain with their children in the US while the children’s cases are adjudicated. Dara Lind, Vox, "As many as 1,000 parents separated from their children are getting a second chance to stay in the US," 13 Sep. 2018 On Monday, a federal judge blocked a policy that would require asylum seekers to languish in Mexico while their cases were adjudicated in the States. Lynn Yaeger, Vogue, "The Week in Washington: An Outrageous Abuse of Power," 14 Apr. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjudicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjudicate

circa 1695, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adjudicate

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātus, past participle of adjūdicāre "to adjudge"

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Statistics for adjudicate

Last Updated

15 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for adjudicate

The first known use of adjudicate was circa 1695

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More Definitions for adjudicate

adjudicate

verb
ad·​ju·​di·​cate | \ ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt How to pronounce adjudicate (audio) \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Legal Definition of adjudicate

transitive verb

1 : to settle either finally or temporarily (the rights and duties of the parties to a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding) on the merits of the issues raised
2 : to pass judgment on as a judge : settle judicially
3 : to pronounce judicially to be was adjudicated a bankrupt was adjudicated the child's father
4 : to convey by judicial sale

intransitive verb

: to come to a judicial decision : act as judge the court adjudicated upon the case

Other Words from adjudicate

adjudication \ ə-​ˌjü-​di-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce adjudication (audio) \ noun
adjudicative \ ə-​ˈjü-​di-​ˌkā-​tiv, -​kə-​ \ noun
adjudicator \ -​ˌkā-​tər How to pronounce adjudicator (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for adjudicate

Latin adjudicare to award in judgment, from ad to, for + judicare to judge — see judge

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