Avogadro's law


Avo·ga·dro's law

noun
\ˌav-ə-ˌgäd-(ˌ)rōz-, ˌäv-, -ˌgad-\

Definition of AVOGADRO'S LAW

: a law in chemistry: equal volumes of all gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of molecules—called also Avogadro's hypothesis

Biographical Note for AVOGADRO'S LAW

Avo·ga·dro \ˌav-ə-ˈgäd-(ˌ)rō, ˌäv-\ , Count Amedea (1776–1856), Italian physicist and chemist. Avogadro is considered one of the founders of physical chemistry. In 1811, he made his outstanding scientific contribution: his hypothesis, now accepted as a scientific law, that equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain the same number of molecules. This hypothesis was a landmark in 19th-century chemistry and is one of the basic concepts of modern chemistry.

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