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New Addenda Section Set for Webster's Third

Merriam-Webster's Unabridged Dictionary Expands

SPRINGFIELD, MASS., April 2002 — This September, America's sweeping chronicle of our evolving English language—Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged—is adding even more words to its corpus. Merriam-Webster announces the arrival of an all-new addenda section to its flagship dictionary—the seventh such supplement to be added to the famous Webster's Third since its original publication in 1961. By early fall 2002, over 18,000 new word entries will simultaneously be added to both the print version available in stores and to the electronic version of the dictionary accessible on-line as the core feature of the new subscription Web site, Merriam-Webster Unabridged (www.Merriam-WebsterUnabridged.com). As a special introductory offer, the print version of the dictionary will include a complimentary one-year subscription to Merriam-Webster Unabridged.

The latest words from all areas of human knowledge will be represented in the new addenda section, covering nearly a decade's worth of social and cultural changes along with advances in science, medicine, and technology. From metaphorical language terms the likes of propeller head and tree hugger to business and finance terms including mindshare and golden handcuff, the hundreds of new words from this latest supplement will join the more than 472,000 entries comprising the foundation of Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged.

Merriam-Webster recognized early that English was used worldwide and that its English language references could serve people all over the globe. In 1890, the milestone unabridged dictionary was named Webster's International Dictionary to reflect the accelerating pace of change at the end of the nineteenth century. In its present edition, Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged has been cited by Library Journal as the "number one reference source of the millennium."

Merriam-Webster, Incorporated
Merriam-Webster Inc. acquired the rights to revise and publish Noah Webster's dictionaries in 1843. Since then, Merriam-Webster has maintained an ongoing commitment to innovation, scholarship, and love of language. Today, the company continues as the leader in both print and electronic language reference publishing, with reference products, learning tools, and word games. For more information about a free 14-day trial subscription to Merriam-Webster Unabridged, visit:
http://www.merriam-websterunabridged.com.

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