xerography


xe·rog·ra·phy

noun \zə-ˈrä-grə-fē\

Definition of XEROGRAPHY

1
:  a process for copying graphic matter by the action of light on an electrically charged photoconductive insulating surface in which the latent image is developed with a resinous powder (as toner)
2
xe·ro·graph·ic \ˌzir-ə-ˈgra-fik\ adjective
xe·ro·graph·i·cal·ly \-fi-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

Origin of XEROGRAPHY

International Scientific Vocabulary
First Known Use: 1948

xe·rog·ra·phy

noun \zə-ˈräg-rə-fē, zir-ˈäg-\   (Medical Dictionary)
plural xe·rog·ra·phies

Medical Definition of XEROGRAPHY

1
: a process for copying graphic matter by the action of light on an electrically charged photoconductive insulating surface in which the latent image is developed with a resinous powder
xe·ro·graph·ic \ˌzir-ə-ˈgraf-ik\ adjective
xe·ro·graph·i·cal·ly \-i-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

xerography

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Light shining on the item to be copied is reflected off a mirror, through a lens, and off a second …—© Merriam-Webster Inc.

Image-forming process that relies on a photoconductive substance whose electrical resistance decreases when light falls on it. Xerography is the basis of the most widely used document-copying machines (see photocopier). The process was invented in the 1930s by U.S. physicist Chester F. Carlson (1906–1968) and developed in the 1940s and '50s by Xerox Corp. (then called Haloid). Light passing through or reflected from a document reaches a selenium-coated drum surface onto which negatively charged particles of ink (toner) are sprayed, forming an image of the document on the drum. As a sheet of paper is passed close to the drum, a positive electric charge under the sheet attracts the negatively charged ink particles, transferring the image to the copy paper. Heat briefly applied fuses the ink particles to the paper. The first commercially successful xerographic copier was introduced in 1959.

Browse

Next Word in the Dictionary: xeromorph
Previous Word in the Dictionary: xerogel
All Words Near: xerography

Seen & Heard

What made you want to look up xerography? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).