Dictionary

x–ray

verb, often capitalized \ˈeks-ˌrā\

: to examine and make images of (things, such as the bones and organs inside the body) by using X-rays

Full Definition of X-RAY

transitive verb
:  to examine, treat, or photograph with X-rays

First Known Use of X-RAY

1899

Other Medicine Terms

analgesia, angina, diabetes, hepatitis, homeopathy, logorrhea, palliate, pandemic

X–ray

noun \ˈeks-ˌrā\

X-rays : powerful invisible rays that can pass through various objects and that make it possible to see inside things (such as the human body)

: an image that is created by using X-rays and that is usually used for medical purposes

: a medical examination that involves using X-rays

Full Definition of X-RAY

1
:  any of the electromagnetic radiations that have an extremely short wavelength of less than 100 angstroms and have the properties of penetrating various thicknesses of all solids, of producing secondary radiations by impinging on material bodies, and of acting on photographic films and plates as light does
2
:  a photograph obtained by use of X-rays
X–ray adjective

First Known Use of X-RAY

1896

Other Medicine Terms

analgesia, angina, diabetes, hepatitis, homeopathy, logorrhea, palliate, pandemic
X-RAY Defined for Kids

x–ray

verb , often cap X \ˈeks-ˌrā\
x–rayedx–ray·ing

Definition of X-RAY for Kids

:  to examine, treat, or photograph with X-rays <My arm was x-rayed for broken bones.>

X–ray

noun \ˈeks-ˌrā\

Definition of X-RAY for Kids

1
:  a powerful invisible ray made up of very short waves that is somewhat similar to light and that is able to pass through some solids and acts on photographic film like light
2
:  a photograph taken by the use of X-rays <an X-ray of the lungs>

Word History of X-RAY

In November, 1895, the German scientist Wilhelm Röntgen was conducting an experiment on the properties of electron tubes. He noticed that a fluorescent surface in the vicinity of the tube would light up even if shielded from the tube's direct light. A thick metal object would block some of the rays, while a less dense object such as wood would cast only a weak shadow. Röntgen's explanation was that the tube produced some type of invisible radiation that could pass through substances that blocked ordinary light. Because he did not know the nature of this radiation, he named it X-Strahl—translated into English as X-ray—based on the mathematical use of x to indicate an unknown quantity.
Medical Dictionary

x–ray

transitive verb , often capitalized X \ˈeks-ˌrā\

Medical Definition of X–RAY

:  to examine, treat, or photograph with X-rays
July 06, 2015
categorical Hear it
absolute or relating to a category
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