tobacco

55 ENTRIES FOUND:

to·bac·co

noun \tə-ˈba-(ˌ)kō\

: a plant that produces leaves which are smoked in cigarettes, pipes, etc.

: the leaves of the tobacco plant used for smoking or chewing

: products (such as cigars or cigarettes) that are made from tobacco

plural to·bac·cos

Full Definition of TOBACCO

1
:  any of a genus (Nicotiana) of chiefly American plants of the nightshade family with viscid foliage and tubular flowers; especially :  a tall erect annual tropical American herb (North tabacum) cultivated for its leaves
2
:  the leaves of cultivated tobacco prepared for use in smoking or chewing or as snuff
3
:  manufactured products of tobacco (as cigars or cigarettes); also :  smoking as a practice <has sworn off tobacco>
4
:  a moderate brown

Examples of TOBACCO

  1. a farm that grows tobacco
  2. a state tax on tobacco

Illustration of TOBACCO

Origin of TOBACCO

Spanish tabaco, probably from Taino, roll of tobacco leaves
First Known Use: circa 1565

to·bac·co

noun \tə-ˈbak-(ˌ)ō\   (Medical Dictionary)
plural to·bac·cos

Medical Definition of TOBACCO

1
: any plant of the genus Nicotiana; especially : an annual South American herb (N. tabacum) cultivated for its leaves
2
: the leaves of cultivated tobacco prepared for use in smoking or chewing or as snuff
3
: manufactured products of tobacco; also : the use of tobacco as a practice

Illustration of TOBACCO

tobacco

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Any of numerous species of plants in the genus Nicotiana, or the cured leaves of several of the species, used after processing in various ways for smoking, snuffing, chewing, and extracting of nicotine. Native to South America, Mexico, and the West Indies, common tobacco (N. tabacum) grows 4–6 ft (1–2 m) high and bears usually pink flowers and huge leaves, as long as 2–3 ft (0.6–1 m) and about half as wide. When Christopher Columbus reached the Americas, he reported natives using tobacco as it is used today, as well as in religious ceremonies. Believed to have medicinal properties, tobacco was introduced into Europe and the rest of the world, becoming the chief commodity that British colonists exchanged for European manufactured articles. Awareness of the numerous serious health risks posed by tobacco, including various cancers and a range of respiratory diseases, has led to campaigns against its use, but the number of tobacco users worldwide continues to rise. The World Health Organization estimates that smoking now causes three million deaths annually and within two decades will cause more deaths than any single disease.

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