Dictionary

symmetry

noun sym·me·try \ˈsi-mə-trē\

: the quality of something that has two sides or halves that are the same or very close in size, shape, and position : the quality of having symmetrical parts

plural sym·me·tries

Full Definition of SYMMETRY

1
:  balanced proportions; also :  beauty of form arising from balanced proportions
2
:  the property of being symmetrical; especially :  correspondence in size, shape, and relative position of parts on opposite sides of a dividing line or median plane or about a center or axis — compare bilateral symmetry, radial symmetry
3
:  a rigid motion of a geometric figure that determines a one-to-one mapping onto itself
4
:  the property of remaining invariant under certain changes (as of orientation in space, of the sign of the electric charge, of parity, or of the direction of time flow) —used of physical phenomena and of equations describing them
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Examples of SYMMETRY

  1. the symmetry of the human body
  2. The building has perfect symmetry.

Origin of SYMMETRY

Latin symmetria, from Greek, from symmetros symmetrical, from syn- + metron measure — more at measure
First Known Use: 1563

Other Mathematics and Statistics Terms

abscissa, denominator, divisor, equilateral, exponent, hypotenuse, logarithm, oblique, radii, rhomb
SYMMETRY Defined for Kids

symmetry

noun sym·me·try \ˈsi-mə-trē\
plural sym·me·tries

Definition of SYMMETRY for Kids

:  close agreement in size, shape, and position of parts that are on opposite sides of a dividing line or center :  an arrangement involving regular and balanced proportions <the symmetry of the human body>
Medical Dictionary

symmetry

noun sym·me·try \ˈsim-ə-trē\
plural sym·me·tries

Medical Definition of SYMMETRY

1
:  correspondence in size, shape, and relative position of parts on opposite sides of a dividing line or median plane or about a center or axis—see bilateral symmetry, radial symmetry
2
:  the property of remaining invariant under certain changes (as of orientation in space, of the sign of the electric charge, of parity, or of the direction of time flow)—used of physical phenomena and of equations describing them
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