spark


1spark

noun \ˈspärk\

Definition of SPARK

1
a :  a small particle of a burning substance thrown out by a body in combustion or remaining when combustion is nearly completed
b :  a hot glowing particle struck from a larger mass; especially :  one heated by friction
2
a :  a luminous disruptive electrical discharge of very short duration between two conductors separated by a gas (as air)
b :  the discharge in a spark plug
c :  the mechanism controlling the discharge in a spark plug
3
:  sparkle, flash
4
:  something that sets off a sudden force <provided the spark that helped the team to rally>
5
:  a latent particle capable of growth or developing :  germ <still retains a spark of decency>
6
plural but sing in constr :  a radio operator on a ship

Origin of SPARK

Middle English sparke, from Old English spearca; akin to Middle Dutch sparke spark and perhaps to Latin spargere to scatter
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Electrical Engineering Terms

feedback, fuse, incandescent, noise, resonance

Rhymes with SPARK

2spark

verb

Definition of SPARK

intransitive verb
1
a :  to throw out sparks
b :  to flash or fall like sparks
2
:  to produce sparks; specifically :  to have the electric ignition working
3
:  to respond with enthusiasm
transitive verb
1
:  to set off in a burst of activity :  activate <the question sparked a lively discussion> —often used with off
2
:  to stir to activity :  incite <sparked her team to victory>
spark·er noun

First Known Use of SPARK

13th century

3spark

noun

Definition of SPARK

1
:  a foppish young man
2
:  lover, beau
spark·ish \ˈspär-kish\ adjective

Origin of SPARK

perhaps from 1spark
First Known Use: circa 1600

4spark

verb

Definition of SPARK

:  woo, court
spark·er noun

First Known Use of SPARK

1787

Spark

biographical name \ˈspärk\

Definition of SPARK

Dame Muriel (Sarah) 1918–2006 née Camberg British writer

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