scattering


1scat·ter·ing

noun \ˈska-tə-riŋ\

: a small number or group of things or people that are seen or found at different places or times

Full Definition of SCATTERING

1
:  an act or process in which something scatters or is scattered
2
:  something scattered: as
a :  a small number or quantity interspersed here and there <a scattering of visitors>
b :  the random change in direction of the particles constituting a beam or wave front due to collision with particles of the medium traversed

Examples of SCATTERING

  1. <the scattering of the protesters suddenly turned violent and chaotic>
  2. <a scattering of people in the mostly empty theater>

First Known Use of SCATTERING

14th century

Rhymes with SCATTERING

2scattering

adjective

Definition of SCATTERING

1
:  going in various directions
2
:  found or placed far apart and in no order
3
:  divided among many or several <scattering votes>
scat·ter·ing·ly \ˈska-tə-riŋ-lē\ adverb

First Known Use of SCATTERING

15th century

scat·ter·ing

noun    (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of SCATTERING

: the random change in direction of the particles constituting a beam or wave front due to collision with particles of the medium traversed

scattering

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

In physics, the change in direction of motion of a particle because of a collision with another particle. The collision can occur between two charged particles; it need not involve direct physical contact. Experiments show that the trajectory of the scattered particle is a hyperbola and that, as the bombarding particle is aimed more closely toward the scattering centre, the angle of deflection decreases. The term scattering is also used for the diffusion of electromagnetic waves by the atmosphere, resulting, for example, in long-range radio reception on the ground. See also Rayleigh scattering.

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