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rutilant

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adjective ru·ti·lant \ˈrü-tə-lənt\

Definition of rutilant

  1. :  having a reddish glow



Did You Know?

Rutilant, which first appeared in English late in the 15th century, is used in English today to describe anything with a reddish or fiery glow, such as a sunset or flushed skin. It derives from the Latin rutilus, meaning "ruddy," which is probably related to the Latin ruber, meaning "red." "Ruber" itself is a direct ancestor of our word rubella (a disease named for the reddish color one's skin turns when afflicted with the condition) and "rubric" (which, among other things, can refer to a book or manuscript heading that is done or underlined in red). "Ruber" is also a distant relative of several English words for things that bear a reddish tone (including "russet," "rouge," and "ruby") and even of the word red itself.

Origin of rutilant

Middle English rutilaunt, from Latin rutilant-, rutilans, past participle of rutilare to glow reddish, from rutilus ruddy; probably akin to Latin ruber red — more at red


First Known Use: 15th century


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