religion

8 ENTRIES FOUND:

re·li·gion

noun \ri-ˈli-jən\

: the belief in a god or in a group of gods

: an organized system of beliefs, ceremonies, and rules used to worship a god or a group of gods

: an interest, a belief, or an activity that is very important to a person or group

Full Definition of RELIGION

1
a :  the state of a religious <a nun in her 20th year of religion>
b (1) :  the service and worship of God or the supernatural
(2) :  commitment or devotion to religious faith or observance
2
:  a personal set or institutionalized system of religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices
3
archaic :  scrupulous conformity :  conscientiousness
4
:  a cause, principle, or system of beliefs held to with ardor and faith
re·li·gion·less adjective

Examples of RELIGION

  1. Many people turn to religion for comfort in a time of crisis.
  2. There are many religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism.
  3. Shinto is a religion that is unique to Japan.
  4. Hockey is a religion in Canada.
  5. Politics are a religion to him.
  6. Where I live, high school football is religion.
  7. Food is religion in this house.

Origin of RELIGION

Middle English religioun, from Anglo-French religiun, Latin religion-, religio supernatural constraint, sanction, religious practice, perhaps from religare to restrain, tie back — more at rely
First Known Use: 13th century

Other Religion (Eastern and Other) Terms

Zen, antinomian, avatar, gnosticism, illuminati, ineffable, karma, koan, mantra

religion

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Relation of human beings to God or the gods or to whatever they consider sacred or, in some cases, merely supernatural. Archaeological evidence suggests that religious beliefs have existed since the first human communities. They are generally shared by a community, and they express the communal culture and values through myth, doctrine, and ritual. Worship is probably the most basic element of religion, but moral conduct, right belief, and participation in religious institutions also constitute elements of the religious life. Religions attempt to answer basic questions intrinsic to the human condition (Why do we suffer? Why is there evil in the world? What happens to us when we die?) through the relationship to the sacred or supernatural or (e.g., in the case of Buddhism) through perception of the true nature of reality. Broadly speaking, some religions (e.g., Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) are outwardly focused, and others (e.g., Jainism, Buddhism) are inwardly focused.

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