ratify


rat·i·fy

transitive verb \ˈra-tə-ˌfī\

: to make (a treaty, agreement, etc.) official by signing it or voting for it

rat·i·fiedrat·i·fy·ing

Full Definition of RATIFY

:  to approve and sanction formally :  confirm <ratify a treaty>
rat·i·fi·ca·tion \ˌra-tə-fə-ˈkā-shən\ noun
rat·i·fi·er \ˈra-tə-ˌfī(-ə)r\ noun

Examples of RATIFY

  1. A number of countries have refused to ratify the treaty.
  2. <Lincoln's home state of Illinois was the first to ratify the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which provided for the abolition of slavery.>

Origin of RATIFY

Middle English ratifien, from Anglo-French ratifier, from Medieval Latin ratificare, from Latin ratus determined, from past participle of reri to calculate — more at reason
First Known Use: 14th century

Other Government and Politics Terms

agent provocateur, agitprop, autarky, cabal, egalitarianism, federalism, hegemony, plenipotentiary, popular sovereignty, socialism

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