psychotherapy

2 ENTRIES FOUND:

psy·cho·ther·a·py

noun \-ˈther-ə-pē\

: treatment of mental or emotional illness by talking about problems rather than by using medicine or drugs

Full Definition of PSYCHOTHERAPY

:  treatment of mental or emotional disorder or of related bodily ills by psychological means
psy·cho·ther·a·pist \-pist\ noun

Origin of PSYCHOTHERAPY

International Scientific Vocabulary
First Known Use: circa 1890

psy·cho·ther·a·py

noun \ˌsī-kō-ˈther-ə-pē\   (Medical Dictionary)
plural psy·cho·ther·a·pies

Medical Definition of PSYCHOTHERAPY

1
: treatment of mental or emotional disorder or maladjustment by psychological means especially involving verbal communication (as in psychoanalysis, nondirective psychotherapy, reeducation, or hypnosis)
2
: any alteration in an individual's interpersonal environment, relationships, or life situation brought about especially by a qualified therapist and intended to have the effect of alleviating symptoms of mental or emotional disturbance

psychotherapy

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Treatment of psychological, emotional, or behaviour disorders through interpersonal communications between the patient and a trained counselor or therapist. The goal of many modern individual and group therapies is to establish a central relationship of trust in which the client or patient can feel free to express personal thoughts and emotions and thus gain insight into his condition and generally share in the healing power of words. Such therapies include psychoanalysis and its variants (see Alfred Adler; Carl Gustav Jung), client-centred or nondirective psychotherapy, Gestalt therapy (see Gestalt psychology), play and art therapy, and general counseling. In contrast, behaviour therapy focuses on modifying behaviour by reinforcement techniques without concerning itself with internal states.

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