prose


1prose

noun \ˈprōz\

: writing that is not poetry : ordinary writing

Full Definition of PROSE

1
a :  the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing
b :  a literary medium distinguished from poetry especially by its greater irregularity and variety of rhythm and its closer correspondence to the patterns of everyday speech
2
:  a dull or ordinary style, quality, or condition

Examples of PROSE

  1. She writes in very clear prose.
  2. … the esteemed critic James Wood reaches out to assure the common reader … that his prose is as free as he can make it of what James Joyce termed the true scholastic stink of so much academic writing. —Walter Kirn, New York Times Book Review, 17 Aug. 2008

Origin of PROSE

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin prosa, from feminine of prorsus, prosus, straightforward, being in prose, contraction of proversus, past participle of provertere to turn forward, from pro- forward + vertere to turn — more at pro-, worth
First Known Use: 14th century

Other Literature Terms

apophasis, bathos, bildungsroman, bowdlerize, caesura, coda, doggerel, euphemism, poesy, prosody

Rhymes with PROSE

2prose

adjective \ˈprōz\

Definition of PROSE

1
:  of, relating to, or written in prose
2
:  prosaic

Origin of PROSE

(see 1prose)
First Known Use: 14th century

Other Literature Terms

apophasis, bathos, bildungsroman, bowdlerize, caesura, coda, doggerel, euphemism, poesy, prosody

3prose

verb \ˈprōz\
prosedpros·ing

Definition of PROSE

intransitive verb
1
:  to write prose
2
:  to write or speak in a dull or ordinary manner

Examples of PROSE

  1. In the meantime, said Traddles, coming back to his chair; and this is the end of my prosing about myself, I get on as well as I can. I don't make much, but I don't spend much… —Charles Dickens, David Copperfield, 1850

Origin of PROSE

(see 1prose)
First Known Use: 1642

Other Literature Terms

apophasis, bathos, bildungsroman, bowdlerize, caesura, coda, doggerel, euphemism, poesy, prosody

prose

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Literary medium distinguished from poetry especially by its greater irregularity and variety of rhythm and its closer correspondence to the patterns of everyday speech. Though it is readily distinguishable from poetry in that it does not treat a line as a formal unit, the significant differences between prose and poetry are of tone, pace, and sometimes subject matter.

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