propaganda


pro·pa·gan·da

noun \ˌprä-pə-ˈgan-də, ˌprō-\

: ideas or statements that are often false or exaggerated and that are spread in order to help a cause, a political leader, a government, etc.

Full Definition of PROPAGANDA

1
capitalized :  a congregation of the Roman curia having jurisdiction over missionary territories and related institutions
2
:  the spreading of ideas, information, or rumor for the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause, or a person
3
:  ideas, facts, or allegations spread deliberately to further one's cause or to damage an opposing cause; also :  a public action having such an effect
pro·pa·gan·dist \-dist\ noun or adjective
pro·pa·gan·dis·tic \-ˌgan-ˈdis-tik\ adjective
pro·pa·gan·dis·ti·cal·ly \-ti-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

Examples of PROPAGANDA

  1. He was accused of spreading propaganda.
  2. The report was nothing but lies and propaganda.
  3. She didn't buy into the propaganda of her day that women had to be soft and submissive. —Maria Shriver, Time, 26 Oct. 2009

Origin of PROPAGANDA

New Latin, from Congregatio de propaganda fide Congregation for propagating the faith, organization established by Pope Gregory XV †1623
First Known Use: 1718

Rhymes with PROPAGANDA

propaganda

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Manipulation of information to influence public opinion. The term comes from Congregatio de Propaganda Fide (Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith), a missionary organization established by the pope in 1622. Propagandists emphasize the elements of information that support their position and deemphasize or exclude those that do not. Misleading statements and even lies may be used to create the desired effect in the public audience. Lobbying, advertising, and missionary activity are all forms of propaganda, but the term is most commonly used in the political arena. Prior to the 20th century, pictures and the written media were the principal instruments of propaganda; radio, television, motion pictures, and the Internet later joined their ranks. Authoritarian and totalitarian regimes use propaganda to win and keep the support of the populace. In wartime, propaganda directed by a country at its own civilian population and military forces can boost morale; propaganda aimed at the enemy is an element of psychological warfare.

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