Quantcast
Merriam-Webster Logo
  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
  • Scrabble
  • Spanish Central
  • Learner's Dictionary
1

predicate

play
noun pred·i·cate \ˈpre-di-kət\

Simple Definition of predicate

  • grammar : the part of a sentence that expresses what is said about the subject

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of predicate

  1. 1 a :  something that is affirmed or denied of the subject in a proposition in logic b :  a term designating a property or relation

  2. 2 :  the part of a sentence or clause that expresses what is said of the subject and that usually consists of a verb with or without objects, complements, or adverbial modifiers

predicative

play \-kə-tiv, -ˌkā-\ adjective

predicatively

adverb

Examples of predicate in a sentence

  1. In the sentence The child threw the ball, the subject is the child and the predicate is threw the ball.



Origin and Etymology of predicate

Middle English, from Late Latin praedicatum, from neuter of praedicatus


First Known Use: 15th century

Other Grammar and Linguistics Terms

Rhymes with predicate


2

predicate

play
verb pred·i·cate \ˈpre-də-ˌkāt\

Simple Definition of predicate

  • : to base (something) on or upon something else

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of predicate

predicated

predicating

  1. transitive verb
  2. 1 a :  affirm, declare b archaic :  preach

  3. 2 a :  to assert to be a quality, attribute, or property —used with following of <predicates intelligence of humans> b :  to make (a term) the predicate in a proposition

  4. 3 :  found, base —usually used with on <the theory is predicated on recent findings>

  5. 4 :  imply

Examples of predicate in a sentence

  1. <she has predicated her theory on recent findings by other astronomers>



Did You Know?

The verb predicate means, among other things, "to found or base." Despite being attested as early as 1754, that sense has endured attack as a misuse on the grounds that it is not true to its Latin root praedicare, meaning "to proclaim, assert." This criticism, however, has subsided. Predicate can also mean "imply," but be careful about using it to mean "predict"-that use does appear in published sources sometimes, but it's an easy target for usage commentators, who are bound to consider it an all-too-predictable error. The meaning of predicate directly tapped from its Latin root-that is, "to assert"-most often occurs in metaphysic contemplation. A simplistic example of such use is the statement "if y is said to be x (e.g., an apple is a fruit), everything that is predicated of y is predicated of x."

Origin and Etymology of predicate

Late Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicare to assert, predicate logically, preach, from Latin, to proclaim, assert — more at preach


First Known Use: circa 1552

Rhymes with predicate

abdicate, abnegate, abrogate, acclimate, acerbate, acetate, activate, actuate, acylate, adsorbate, advocate, adulate, adumbrate, aggravate, aggregate, agitate, allocate, altercate, ambulate, amputate, animate, annotate, annulate, antedate, antiquate, apartheid, apostate, approbate, arbitrate, arcuate, arrogate, aspirate, auscultate, automate, aviate, bantamweight, Bering Strait, bifurcate, billingsgate, bipinnate, boilerplate, bombinate, brachiate, buffer state, cabinmate, cachinnate, calculate, calibrate, caliphate, candidate, cannulate, cantillate, capitate, captivate, carbonate, carbon-date, carinate, carload rate, castigate, catenate, cavitate, celebrate, cerebrate, chlorinate, circinate, circulate, city-state, client state, cogitate, colligate, collimate, collocate, commentate, commutate, compensate, complicate, concentrate, condensate, confiscate, conglobate, conjugate, consecrate, constellate, consternate, constipate, consummate, contemplate, copperplate, copulate, coronate, correlate, corrugate, coruscate, counterweight, crepitate, criminate, cruciate, cucullate, culminate, cultivate, cumulate, cuneate, cupulate, cuspidate, cyclamate, Davis Strait, deaerate, decimate, decollate, decorate, decussate, defalcate, defecate, deflagrate, dehydrate, delegate, demarcate, demonstrate, denigrate, Denmark Strait, depilate, deviate, deprecate, depredate, derivate, derogate, desecrate, desiccate, designate, desolate, desquamate, detonate, devastate, deviate, digitate, diplomate, discarnate, dislocate, dissertate, dissipate, distillate, divagate, dominate, double date, edentate, educate, elevate, elongate, eluate, emanate, emigrate, emirate, emulate, enervate, ephorate, escalate, estimate, estivate, excavate, exchange rate, exculpate, execrate, expiate, explicate, expurgate, exsiccate, extirpate, extricate, exudate, fabricate, fascinate, fashion plate, featherweight, fecundate, federate, fenestrate, festinate, fibrillate, first estate, flagellate, flocculate, fluctuate, fluoridate, foliate, formulate, fornicate, fourth estate, fractionate, fragmentate, fulminate, fumigate, fustigate, geminate, generate, germinate, glaciate, Golden Gate, graduate, granulate, gratulate, gravitate, heavyweight, hebetate, herniate, hesitate, hibernate, Hudson Strait, hundredweight, hyphenate, ideate, imamate, imbricate, imitate, immigrate, immolate, impetrate, implicate, imprecate, impregnate, incarnate, increate, incubate, inculcate, inculpate, incurvate, indagate, indicate, indurate, infiltrate, in-line skate, in-migrate, innervate, innovate, insensate, inspissate, instigate, insulate, interstate, intestate, intimate, intonate, intraplate, inundate, invocate, iodate, irrigate, irritate, isolate, iterate, jubilate, juniorate, lacerate, laminate, Latinate, laureate, legislate, levigate, levitate, liberate, license plate, liquidate, litigate, littermate, lubricate, macerate, machinate, magistrate, marginate, margravate, marinate, masticate, masturbate, maturate, mediate, medicate, meditate, meliorate, menstruate, microstate, micturate, middleweight, militate, mithridate, mitigate, moderate, modulate, motivate, multistate, mutilate, nation-state, nauseate, navigate, neonate, nictitate, niobate, nominate, numerate, obfuscate, objurgate, obligate, obovate, obviate, on a plate, operate, opiate, orchestrate, ordinate, oscillate, osculate, out-migrate, out-of-date, overstate, overweight, ovulate, paginate, palliate, palpitate, paperweight, patinate, peculate, penetrate, pennyweight, percolate, perennate, perforate, permeate, perpetrate, personate, police state, pollinate, populate, postulate, potentate, procreate, profligate, promulgate, propagate, prorogate, pullulate, pulmonate, punctuate, quantitate, rabbinate, radiate, real estate, recreate, re-create, reinstate, relegate, relocate, remonstrate, renovate, replicate, reprobate, resonate, retardate, retranslate, roller-skate, roseate, rubricate, ruinate, ruminate, runagate, running mate, rusticate, sagittate, salivate, sanitate, satiate, saturate, scintillate, second-rate, segregate, self-portrait, separate, sequestrate, seriate, sibilate, silver plate, simulate, sinuate, situate, speculate, spoliate, stablemate, starting gate, steady state, stimulate, stipulate, strangulate, stridulate, stylobate, subjugate, sublimate, subrogate, subulate, suffocate, sultanate, Sunda Strait, supplicate, surrogate, syncopate, syndicate, tablemate, tabulate, target date, terminate, tessellate, tête-à-tête, thirty-eight, titillate, titivate, tolerate, transmigrate, transudate, tribulate, tribunate, trifurcate, trilobate, tripinnate, triplicate, tunicate, turbinate, ulcerate, ululate, umbellate, uncinate, underrate, understate, underweight, undulate, ungulate, urinate, vaccinate, vacillate, validate, valuate, variate, vegetate, venerate, ventilate, vertebrate, vicarate, vindicate, violate, vitiate, water gate, Watergate, welfare state, welterweight


3

predicate

play
adjective pred·i·cate \ˈpre-di-kət\

Simple Definition of predicate

  • grammar : used after a linking verb to describe a noun that comes before the verb

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of predicate

  1. :  completing the meaning of a copula <predicate adjective> <predicate noun>

Examples of predicate in a sentence

  1. In the sun is hot, hot is a predicate adjective.



1887

First Known Use of predicate

1887

Other Grammar and Linguistics Terms


PREDICATE Defined for Kids

1

predicate

play
noun pred·i·cate \ˈpre-di-kət\

Definition of predicate for Students

  1. :  the part of a sentence or clause that tells what is said about the subject <“Rang” in “the doorbell rang” is the predicate.>




2

predicate

play
adjective pred·i·cate

Definition of predicate for Students

  1. :  completing the meaning of a linking verb <“Sweet” in “the sugar is sweet” is a predicate adjective.>




Law Dictionary

1

predicate

play
transitive verb pred·i·cate \ˈpre-də-ˌkāt\

Legal Definition of predicate

predicated

predicating

  1. :  to set or ground on something :  find a basis for —usually used with on <Jurisdiction over the lawsuit was predicated on the California contacts — Daimler AG v. Bauman, 571 U.S. ___ (2014)>




2

predicate

play
adjective pred·i·cate \ˈpre-di-kət\

Legal Definition of predicate

  1. 1 :  occurring prior to and providing the basis or part of the basis for a conviction for another offense (as a RICO offense) <predicate acts>

  2. 2 :  occurring prior to and providing the basis for sentence enhancement upon conviction for a later offense

predicate

noun




Seen and Heard

What made you want to look up predicate? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

the lowest point

Get Word of the Day daily email!

WORD GAMES

Take a 3-minute break and test your skills!

fox-in-summer-forest

Which of these is a synonym of inchoate?

formless massive frightening experimental
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ