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1

piano

play
adverb or adjective pi·a·no \pē-ˈä-(ˌ)nō\

Simple Definition of piano

  • music : quietly or softly

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of piano

  1. :  at a soft volume :  soft —used as a direction in music

Origin and Etymology of piano

Italian, from Late Latin planus smooth, from Latin, level — more at floor


First Known Use: 1683


2

piano

play
noun pi·ano \pē-ˈa-(ˌ)nō also -ˈä-\

Simple Definition of piano

  • : a large musical instrument with a keyboard that you play by pressing black and white keys and that produces sound when small hammers inside the piano hit steel wires

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of piano

plural

pianos

  1. :  a musical instrument having steel wire strings that sound when struck by felt-covered hammers operated from a keyboard

Examples of piano in a sentence

  1. Do you play the piano?

  2. He takes piano lessons on Wednesdays.



Origin and Etymology of piano

Italian, short for pianoforte, from gravicembalo col piano e forte, literally, harpsichord with soft and loud; from the fact that its tones could be varied in loudness


First Known Use: 1803


Piano

play
biographical name Pi·a·no \pē-ˈä-(ˌ)nō\

Definition of Piano

  1. Renzo 1937–     Ital. architect





PIANO Defined for Kids

piano

play
noun pi·a·no \pē-ˈa-nō\

Definition of piano for Students

plural

pianos

  1. :  a keyboard instrument having steel wire strings that make a sound when struck by hammers covered with felt



History for piano

When a harpsichord is played, pressing on the keys causes the strings to be plucked in such a way that loudness and softness cannot be controlled. Around 1700 an Italian instrument maker named Bartolomeo Cristofori invented a mechanism by which the strings of a harpsichord would be struck by felt-covered hammers. This device allowed the performer to play notes with varying degrees of loudness. In Italian this new instrument was called gravicembalo col piano e forte, “harpsichord with soft and loud.” The name was borrowed into English as pianoforte or fortepiano, which was eventually shortened to just piano.


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