peremptory


pe·remp·to·ry

adjective \pə-ˈrem(p)-t(ə-)rē\

—used to describe an order, command, etc., that you must obey without any questions or excuses

: having or showing the insulting attitude of people who think that they should be obeyed without question

Full Definition of PEREMPTORY

1
a :  putting an end to or precluding a right of action, debate, or delay; specifically :  not providing an opportunity to show cause why one should not comply <a peremptory mandamus>
b :  admitting of no contradiction
2
:  expressive of urgency or command <a peremptory call>
3
a :  characterized by often imperious or arrogant self-assurance <how insolent of late he is become, how proud, how peremptory — Shakespeare>
b :  indicative of a peremptory attitude or nature :  haughty <a peremptory tone> <peremptory disregard of an objection>
pe·remp·to·ri·ly \-ˈrem(p)-t(ə-)rə-lē; -ˌrem(p)-ˈtr-ə-lē\ adverb
pe·remp·to·ri·ness \-ˈrem(p)-t(ə-)rē-nəs\ noun

Examples of PEREMPTORY

  1. Her peremptory tone angered me.
  2. <the governor's peremptory personal assistant began telling the crowd of reporters and photographers exactly where they had to stand>

Origin of PEREMPTORY

Middle English peremptorie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin peremptorius, from Latin, destructive, from perimere to take entirely, destroy, from per- thoroughly + emere to take — more at redeem
First Known Use: 15th century

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