wood


1wood

adjective \ˈwüd, ˈwōd, ˈwd\

Definition of WOOD

archaic
:  violently mad

Origin of WOOD

Middle English, from Old English wōd insane; akin to Old High German wuot madness — more at vatic
First Known Use: before 12th century

Rhymes with WOOD

2wood

noun \ˈwd\

: the hard substance that makes up the stems and branches of trees and shrubs

: an area of land covered with many trees

woods : a thick growth of trees and bushes that covers a wide area

Full Definition of WOOD

1
a :  a dense growth of trees usually greater in extent than a grove and smaller than a forest —often used in plural but singular or plural in construction
b :  woodland
2
a :  the hard fibrous substance consisting basically of xylem that makes up the greater part of the stems, branches, and roots of trees or shrubs beneath the bark and is found to a limited extent in herbaceous plants
b :  wood suitable or prepared for some use (as burning or building)
3
a :  something made of wood
b :  a golf club having a thick wooden head; also :  a golf club having a similar head made of metal
out of the woods
:  clear of danger or difficulty

Examples of WOOD

  1. Some baseball bats are made out of wood.
  2. The wood on the deck has begun to rot.
  3. Their house is near a small wood.
  4. A thick woods runs along the boundary of the estate.
  5. The house is surrounded by woods.
  6. He went for a hike in the woods.
  7. She hit a wood off the tee.

Origin of WOOD

Middle English wode, from Old English widu, wudu; akin to Old High German witu wood, Old Irish fid tree
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Wood Production Terms

cord, lumber, punk

3wood

adjective \ˈwd\

Definition of WOOD

1
:  wooden
2
:  suitable for cutting or working with wood <a wood saw>
3
or woods \ˈwdz\ :  living, growing, or existing in woods <woods trails>

First Known Use of WOOD

14th century

Other Wood Production Terms

cord, lumber, punk

4wood

verb \ˈwd\

Definition of WOOD

intransitive verb
:  to gather or take on wood
transitive verb
:  to cover with a growth of trees or plant with trees

First Known Use of WOOD

1630

Other Wood Production Terms

cord, lumber, punk

Wood

biographical name \ˈwd\

Definition of WOOD

Grant (DeVolson) 1892–1942 Am. painter

Wood

biographical name

Definition of WOOD

Leonard 1860–1927 Am. physician & gen.

wood

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Cross section of a tree trunk. Wood is secondary xylem produced by growth of the vascular cambium …—© Merriam-Webster Inc.

Hard, fibrous material formed by the accumulation of secondary xylem produced by the vascular cambium. It is the principal strengthening tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and shrubs. Wood forms around a central core (pith) in a series of concentric layers called growth rings. A cross section of wood shows the distinction between heartwood and sapwood. Heartwood, the central portion, is darker and composed of xylem cells that are no longer active in the life processes of the tree. Sapwood, the lighter area surrounding the heartwood, contains actively conducting xylem cells. Wood is one of the most abundant and versatile natural materials on earth, and unlike coal, ores, and petroleum, is renewable with proper care. The most widely used woods come from two groups of trees: the conifers, or softwoods (e.g., pine, spruce, fir), and the broadleaves, or hardwoods (e.g., oak, walnut, maple). Trees classified as hardwoods are not necessarily harder than softwoods (e.g., balsa, a hardwood, is one of the softest woods). Density and moisture content affect the strength of wood; in addition to load-bearing strength, other variable factors often tested include elasticity and toughness. Wood is insulating to heat and electricity and has desirable acoustical properties. Some identifying physical characteristics of wood include colour, odour, texture, and grain (the direction of the wood fibres). Some 10,000 different wood products are commercially available, ranging from lumber and plywood to paper, from fine furniture to toothpicks. Chemically derived products from wood and wood residues include cellophane, charcoal, dyestuffs, explosives, lacquers, and turpentine. Wood is also used for fuel in many parts of the world.

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