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objurgation

play
noun ob·jur·ga·tion \ˌäb-jər-ˈgā-shən\

Definition of objurgation

  1. :  a harsh rebuke

objurgate

play \ˈäb-jər-ˌgāt\ transitive verb

objurgatory

play \əb-ˈjər-gə-ˌtȯr-ē\ adjective


Examples of objurgation in a sentence

  1. <particularly humiliating for the general was the White House's objurgation of his misguided and unauthorized attempt at enunciating foreign policy>



Did You Know?

Objurgation traces to Latin objurgare ("to scold or blame"), which was formed from "ob-" ("against") and "jurgare" ("to quarrel" or, literally, "to take to law" - in other words, "to bring a lawsuit"). "Jur-" in Latin means law, and there are several English words related to "objurgation" that have legal implications, including "perjury," "abjure," "jurisprudence," and even "injury." But despite its etymological connection to the law, the word objurgation carries no legal weight. It refers to nothing more than an unusually harsh or severe scolding.

Origin and Etymology of objurgation

Middle English objurgacyon, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French objurgation, from Latin objurgation-, objurgatio, from objurgare to scold, blame, from ob- against + jurgare to quarrel, literally, to take to law, from jur-, jus law + -igare (from agere to lead) — more at ob-, just, agent


First Known Use: 15th century


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