Dictionary

nominative

adjective nom·i·na·tive \ˈnäm-nə-tiv, ˈnä-mə-; 2 & 3 are also ˈnä-mə-ˌnā-\

Definition of NOMINATIVE

1
a :  marking typically the subject of a verb especially in languages that have relatively full inflection <nominative case>
b :  of or relating to the nominative case <a nominative ending>
2
:  nominated or appointed by nomination
3
:  bearing a person's name
nominative noun
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Origin of NOMINATIVE

Middle English nominatyf, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French nominatif, from Latin (casus) nominativus nominative case, from nominare; from the traditional use of the nominative form in naming a noun
First Known Use: 14th century

Other Grammar and Linguistics Terms

ablaut, allusion, anacoluthon, diacritic, gerund, idiom, infinitive, metaphor, semiotics, simile
NOMINATIVE Defined for Kids

nominative

adjective nom·i·na·tive \ˈnä-mə-nə-tiv\

Definition of NOMINATIVE for Kids

:  being or belonging to the case of a noun or pronoun that is usually the subject of a verb <“Mary” in “Mary sees Anne” is in the nominative case.>

Word Root of NOMINATIVE

The Latin word nomen, meaning name, and its form nominis give us the root nomin. Words from the Latin nomen have something to do with names. To nominate is to name someone as a candidate for election or for an honor. Anything nominal, such as a position or office, exists in name only. A noun or pronoun in the nominative case is in the form that names the subject of a sentence, for example the pronoun I.

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