newton

5 ENTRIES FOUND:

new·ton

noun \ˈnü-tən, ˈnyü-\

Definition of NEWTON

:  the unit of force in the meter-kilogram-second system equal to the force required to impart an acceleration of one meter per second per second to a mass of one kilogram

Origin of NEWTON

Sir Isaac Newton
First Known Use: 1904

New·ton

biographical name \ˈnü-tən, ˈnyü-\

Definition of NEWTON

Sir Isaac 1642–1727 Eng. math. & physicist

New·ton

geographical name \ˈnü-tən, ˈnyü-\

Definition of NEWTON

city E Massachusetts W of Boston pop 83,829

new·ton

noun \ˈn(y)üt-ən\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of NEWTON

: the unit of force in the metric system equal to the force required to impart an acceleration of one meter per second per second to a mass of one kilogram

Biographical Note for NEWTON

Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727), British physicist and mathematician. One of the greatest figures in the history of science, Newton made great fundamental discoveries in mathematics and physical science including the method of fluxions (now known as differential calculus); laws concerning the composition of white light and the transmission of light through various media, upon which he built the foundation for the science of optics; and the law of gravitation. The newton unit of force was named in his honor in 1904.

newton

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Absolute unit of force, abbreviated N, in the metre-kilogram-second (MKS) system of physical units (see International System of Units). It is defined as the force necessary to provide a mass of 1 kg with an acceleration of 1 m per second per second. One newton is equal to a force of 100,000 dynes in the centimetre-gram-second (CGS) system, or a force of about 0.2248 lb in the foot-pound-second (English or U.S.) system. It is named for Isaac Newton, whose second law of motion describes the changes a force can produce in the motion of a body.

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