medicine

32 ENTRIES FOUND:

med·i·cine

noun \ˈme-də-sən, British usually ˈmed-sən\

: a substance that is used in treating disease or relieving pain and that is usually in the form of a pill or a liquid

: the science that deals with preventing, curing, and treating diseases

Full Definition of MEDICINE

1
a :  a substance or preparation used in treating disease
b :  something that affects well-being
2
a :  the science and art dealing with the maintenance of health and the prevention, alleviation, or cure of disease
b :  the branch of medicine concerned with the nonsurgical treatment of disease
3
:  a substance (as a drug or potion) used to treat something other than disease
4
:  an object held in traditional American Indian belief to give control over natural or magical forces; also :  magical power or a magical rite
medicine transitive verb

Examples of MEDICINE

  1. He forgot to take his medicine.
  2. Did you look in the medicine cabinet for a pain reliever?
  3. Their research has led to many important advances in modern medicine.
  4. She's interested in a career in medicine.

Origin of MEDICINE

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin medicina, from feminine of medicinus of a physician, from medicus
First Known Use: 13th century

Other Medicine Terms

analgesia, angina, diabetes, hepatitis, homeopathy, logorrhea, palliate, pandemic

med·i·cine

noun \ˈmed-ə-sən, British usually ˈmed-sən\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of MEDICINE

1
: a substance or preparation used in treating disease
2
a : the science and art dealing with the maintenance of health and the prevention, alleviation, or cure of disease b : the branch of medicine concerned with the nonsurgical treatment of disease

medicine

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

The practice concerned with the maintenance of health and the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Medicine may be practiced in doctors' offices, health maintenance organization facilities, hospitals, and clinics. In addition to family practice, internal medicine, and specialties for specific body systems, it includes research, public health, epidemiology, and pharmacology. Each country sets its own requirements for medical degrees (M.D.'s) and licenses. Medical boards and councils set standards and oversee medical education. Boards of certification have stringent requirements for physicians seeking to practice a specialty, and they stress continuing education. Advances in therapy (see therapeutics) and diagnosis have raised complex legal and moral issues in areas such as abortion, euthanasia, and patients' rights. Recent changes include treating patients as partners in their own care and taking cultural factors into consideration.

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