measles

7 ENTRIES FOUND:

mea·sles

noun plural but singular or plural in construction \ˈmē-zəlz\

: a disease that causes a fever and red spots on the skin

Full Definition of MEASLES

1
a :  an acute contagious disease that is caused by a morbillivirus (species Measles virus) and is marked especially by an eruption of distinct red circular spots —called also rubeola
b :  any of various eruptive diseases (as German measles)
2
[Middle English mesel infested with tapeworms, literally, leprous, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin misellus leper, from Latin, wretch, from misellus, diminutive of miser miserable] :  infestation with or disease caused by larval tapeworms in the muscles and tissues

Origin of MEASLES

Middle English meseles, plural of mesel measles, spot characteristic of measles; akin to Middle Dutch masel spot characteristic of measles
First Known Use: 14th century

mea·sles

noun plural but singular or plural in construction \ˈmē-zəlz\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of MEASLES

1
a : an acute contagious disease that is caused by a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus (species Measles virus), that commences with catarrhal symptoms, conjunctivitis, cough, and Koplik's spots on the oral mucous membrane, and that is marked by the appearance on the third or fourth day of an eruption of distinct red circular spots which coalesce in a crescentic form, are slightly raised, and after the fourth day of the eruption gradually decline—called also rubeola b : any of various eruptive diseases (as German measles)
2
: infestation with or disease caused by larval tapeworms in the muscles and tissues; specifically : infestation of cattle and swine with cysticerci of tapeworms that as adults parasitize humans—compare measle

measles

   (Concise Encyclopedia)

Highly contagious viral childhood disease. It initially resembles a severe cold with red eyes and fever; a blotchy rash and higher fever later develop. After recovery, patients have lifelong immunity. Adult patients tend to have more severe cases. Antibiotics now prevent death from secondary infections. Measles itself, for which there is no drug, requires only bed rest, eye protection, and steam for bronchial irritation. A vaccine developed in the 1960s proved not to give permanent immunity and is too heat-sensitive for use in tropical areas. The worldwide incidence of measles continues to rise. Research is currently directed toward development of a more stable vaccine. See also rubella.

Variants of MEASLES

measles or rubeola

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