mangrove

16 ENTRIES FOUND:

man·grove

noun \ˈman-ˌgrōv, ˈmaŋ-\

: a tropical tree that has roots which grow from its branches and that grows in swamps or shallow salt water

Full Definition of MANGROVE

1
:  any of a genus (Rhizophora, especially R. mangle of the family Rhizophoraceae) of tropical maritime trees or shrubs that send out many prop roots and form dense masses important in coastal land building and as foundations of unique ecosystems
2
:  any of numerous trees (as of the genera Avicennia of the vervain family or Sonneratia of the family Sonneratiaceae) with growth habits like those of the true mangroves

Origin of MANGROVE

probably from Portuguese mangue mangrove (from Spanish mangle, probably from Taino) + English grove
First Known Use: 1613

Rhymes with MANGROVE

mangrove

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Any of certain shrubs and trees that belong primarily to the families Rhizophoraceae, Acanthaceae, Lythraceae, Combretaceae, and Arecaceae (palm) and that grow in dense thickets or forests along tidal estuaries, in salt marshes, and on muddy coasts. The term also applies to the thickets and forests of such plants. Mangroves characteristically have prop roots (exposed, supporting roots). In addition, in many species respiratory, or knee, roots project above the mud and have small openings through which air enters, passing through the soft, spongy tissue to the roots beneath the mud. Mangrove fruits put out an embryonic root before they fall from the tree; the root may fix itself in the mud before the fruit separates from the parent. Likewise, branches and trunks put out adventitious roots which, once they are secure in the mud, send up new shoots. The common mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) grows to about 30 ft (9 m) tall and bears short, thick, leathery leaves on short stems and has pale yellow flowers. Its fruit is sweet and wholesome.

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