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malleable

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adjective mal·lea·ble \ˈma-lē-ə-bəl, ˈmal-yə-bəl, ˈma-lə-bəl\

Simple Definition of malleable

  • : capable of being stretched or bent into different shapes

  • : capable of being easily changed or influenced

Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

Full Definition of malleable

  1. 1 :  capable of being extended or shaped by beating with a hammer or by the pressure of rollers

  2. 2 a :  capable of being altered or controlled by outside forces or influences b :  having a capacity for adaptive change

malleability

play \ˌma-lē-ə-ˈbi-lə-tē, ˌmal-yə-, ˌma-lə-\ noun

Examples of malleable in a sentence

  1. The brothers Warner presented a flexible, malleable world that defied Newton, a world of such plasticity that anything imaginable was possible. —Billy Collins, Wall Street Journal, 28–29 June 2008

  2. At each landing the villagers had carved the wonderfully malleable silt into staircases, terraces, crenellations, and ziggurats. —Kenneth Brower, National Geographic Traveler, March 2000

  3. The boy seemed to me possessed by a blind, invalid arrogance, and every human being, as his eye flicked over or flinched against them, became, immediately, as malleable as his mother and his father. —James Baldwin, The Evidence of Things Not Seen, 1985

  4. <the cult leader took advantage of the malleable, compliant personalities of his followers>



Did You Know?

There is a hint about the origins of "malleable" in its first definition. The earliest uses of the word, which first appeared in English in the 14th century, referred primarily to metals that could be reshaped by beating with a hammer. The Middle English word malliable comes to us from Medieval Latin malleabilis, which in turn derives from the Latin verb malleare, meaning "to hammer." "Malleare" itself was created from the Latin word for "hammer": "malleus." If you have guessed that "maul" and "mallet," other English words for specific types of hammers, can also be traced back to "malleus," you have hit the nail on the head.

Origin and Etymology of malleable

Middle English malliable, from Medieval Latin malleabilis, from malleare to hammer, from Latin malleus hammer — more at maul


First Known Use: 14th century

Synonym Discussion of malleable

plastic, pliable, pliant, ductile, malleable, adaptable mean susceptible of being modified in form or nature. plastic applies to substances soft enough to be molded yet capable of hardening into the desired fixed form <plastic materials allow the sculptor greater freedom>. pliable suggests something easily bent, folded, twisted, or manipulated <pliable rubber tubing>. pliant may stress flexibility and sometimes connote springiness <an athletic shoe with a pliant sole>. ductile applies to what can be drawn out or extended with ease <ductile metals such as copper>. malleable applies to what may be pressed or beaten into shape <the malleable properties of gold>. adaptable implies the capability of being easily modified to suit other conditions, needs, or uses <computer hardware that is adaptable>.

Other Metals and Metallurgy Terms


MALLEABLE Defined for Kids

malleable

play
adjective mal·lea·ble \ˈma-lē-ə-bəl, ˈmal-yə-bəl\

Definition of malleable for Students

  1. :  capable of being extended or shaped with blows from a hammer





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