lie

2 ENTRIES FOUND:

1lie

verb \ˈlī\
lay \ˈlā\ lain \ˈlān\ ly·ing \ˈlī-iŋ\

Definition of LIE

intransitive verb
1
a :  to be or to stay at rest in a horizontal position :  be prostrate :  rest, recline <lie motionless> <lie asleep>
b :  to assume a horizontal position —often used with down
c archaic :  to reside temporarily :  stay for the night :  lodge
d :  to have sexual intercourse —used with with
e :  to remain inactive (as in concealment) <lie in wait>
2
:  to be in a helpless or defenseless state <the town lay at the mercy of the invaders>
3
of an inanimate thing :  to be or remain in a flat or horizontal position upon a broad support <books lying on the table>
4
:  to have direction :  extend <the route lay to the west>
5
a :  to occupy a certain relative place or position <hills lie behind us>
b :  to have a place in relation to something else <the real reason lies deeper>
c :  to have an effect through mere presence, weight, or relative position <remorse lay heavily on him>
d :  to be sustainable or admissible
6
:  to remain at anchor or becalmed
7
a :  to have place :  exist <the choice lay between fighting or surrendering>
b :  consist, belong <the success of the book lies in its direct style> <responsibility lay with the adults>
8
:  remain; especially :  to remain unused, unsought, or uncared for
See Usage Discussion at lay
li·er \ˈlī(-ə)r\ noun
lie low
1
:  to lie prostrate, defeated, or disgraced
2
:  to stay in hiding :  strive to avoid notice
3
:  to bide one's time :  remain secretly ready for action

Origin of LIE

Middle English, from Old English licgan; akin to Old High German ligen to lie, Latin lectus bed, Greek lechos
First Known Use: before 12th century

2lie

noun \ˈlī\

Definition of LIE

1
chiefly British :  lay 6
2
:  the position or situation in which something lies (see 1lie) <a golf ball in a difficult lie>
3
:  the haunt of an animal (as a fish) :  covert
4
British :  an act or instance of lying or resting

Origin of LIE

(see 1lie)
First Known Use: 1697

3lie

verb \ˈlī\
liedly·ing \ˈlī-iŋ\

Definition of LIE

intransitive verb
1
:  to make an untrue statement with intent to deceive
2
:  to create a false or misleading impression
transitive verb
:  to bring about by telling lies <lied his way out of trouble>

Origin of LIE

Middle English, from Old English lēogan; akin to Old High German liogan to lie, Old Church Slavic lŭgati
First Known Use: before 12th century

Synonym Discussion of LIE

lie, prevaricate, equivocate, palter, fib mean to tell an untruth. lie is the blunt term, imputing dishonesty <lied about where he had been>. prevaricate softens the bluntness of lie by implying quibbling or confusing the issue <during the hearings the witness did his best to prevaricate>. equivocate implies using words having more than one sense so as to seem to say one thing but intend another <equivocated endlessly in an attempt to mislead her inquisitors>. palter implies making unreliable statements of fact or intention or insincere promises <a swindler paltering with his investors>. fib applies to a telling of a trivial untruth <fibbed about the price of the new suit>.

4lie

noun \ˈlī\

Definition of LIE

1
a :  an assertion of something known or believed by the speaker to be untrue with intent to deceive
b :  an untrue or inaccurate statement that may or may not be believed true by the speaker
2
:  something that misleads or deceives
3
:  a charge of lying (see 3lie)

Origin of LIE

Middle English lige, lie, from Old English lyge; akin to Old High German lugī, Old English lēogan to lie
First Known Use: before 12th century

Lie

biographical name \ˈlē\

Definition of LIE

Jonas 1833–1908 Norw. nov. & dram.

Lie

biographical name

Definition of LIE

Trygve Halvdan 1896–1968 Norw. lawyer; secy.-gen. of U.N. (1946–52)

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