legend


leg·end

noun \ˈle-jənd\

: a story from the past that is believed by many people but cannot be proved to be true

: a famous or important person who is known for doing something extremely well

: a list that explains the symbols on a map

Full Definition of LEGEND

1
a :  a story coming down from the past; especially :  one popularly regarded as historical although not verifiable
b :  a body of such stories <a place in the legend of the frontier>
c :  a popular myth of recent origin
d :  a person or thing that inspires legends
e :  the subject of a legend <its violence was legend even in its own time — William Broyles Jr.>
2
a :  an inscription or title on an object (as a coin)
b :  caption 2b
c :  an explanatory list of the symbols on a map or chart

Examples of LEGEND

  1. I don't believe the legends I've heard about this forest.
  2. the legend of a lost continent
  3. He has become a baseball legend.
  4. The gravestone bears the legend Rest in Peace.

Origin of LEGEND

Middle English legende, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French legende, from Medieval Latin legenda, from Latin, feminine of legendus, gerundive of legere to gather, select, read; akin to Greek legein to gather, say, logos speech, word, reason
First Known Use: 14th century

Related to LEGEND

Synonyms
key

Other Monetary Terms

clad, numismatic, obverse, reverse, scrip, series, specie

legend

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Traditional story or group of stories told about a particular person or place. Formerly the term referred to a tale about a saint. Legends resemble folktales in content; they may include supernatural beings, elements of mythology, or explanations of natural phenomena, but they are associated with a particular locality or person. They are handed down from the past and are popularly regarded as historical though they are not entirely verifiable.

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