lead


1lead

verb \ˈlēd\
led \ˈled\ lead·ing

Definition of LEAD

transitive verb
1
a :  to guide on a way especially by going in advance
b :  to direct on a course or in a direction
c :  to serve as a channel for <a pipe leads water to the house>
2
:  to go through :  live <lead a quiet life>
3
a (1) :  to direct the operations, activity, or performance of <lead an orchestra> (2) :  to have charge of <lead a campaign> (3) :  to ask (a witness) a question in a way that suggests what the answer should be :  to ask (a witness) a leading question
b (1) :  to go at the head of <lead a parade>
(2) :  to be first in or among <lead the league> (3) :  to have a margin over <led his opponent>
4
:  to bring to some conclusion or condition <led to believe otherwise>
5
:  to begin play with <lead trumps>
6
a :  to aim in front of (a moving object) <lead a duck>
b :  to pass a ball or puck just in front of (a moving teammate)
intransitive verb
1
a :  to guide someone or something along a way
b :  to lie, run, or open in a specified place or direction <path leads uphill>
c :  to guide a dance partner through the steps of a dance
2
a :  to be first
b (1) :  begin, open
(2) :  to play the first card of a trick, round, or game
3
:  to tend toward or have a result <study leading to a degree>
4
:  to direct the first of a series of blows at an opponent in boxing
lead one down the garden path also lead one up the garden path

Origin of LEAD

Middle English leden, from Old English ̄dan; akin to Old High German leiten to lead, Old English līthan to go
First Known Use: before 12th century

2lead

noun \ˈlēd\

Definition of LEAD

1
a (1) :  leadership (2) :  example, precedent
b (1) :  position at the front :  vanguard
(2) :  initiative (3) :  the act or privilege of playing first in a card game; also :  the card or suit played first
c :  a margin or measure of advantage or superiority or position in advance
2
:  one that leads: as
a :  lode 2
b :  a channel of water especially through a field of ice
c :  indication, clue
d :  a principal role in a dramatic production; also :  one who plays such a role
e :  leash 1
f (1) :  an introductory section of a news story
(2) :  a news story of chief importance
3
:  an insulated electrical conductor connected to an electrical device
4
:  the course of a rope from end to end
5
:  the amount of axial advance of a point accompanying a complete turn of a thread (as of a screw or worm)
6
:  a position taken by a base runner off a base toward the next
7
:  the first punch of a series or an exchange of punches in boxing
lead·less \-ləs\ adjective

Origin of LEAD

(see 1lead)
First Known Use: 15th century

3lead

adjective \ˈlēd\

Definition of LEAD

:  acting or serving as a lead (see 2lead)or leader <a lead article>

Examples of LEAD

  1. <the lead diplomat is responsible for making policy for the entire embassy>

Origin of LEAD

(see 1lead)
First Known Use: 1828

4lead

noun, often attributive \ˈled\

Definition of LEAD

1
:  a bluish-white soft malleable ductile plastic but inelastic heavy metallic element found mostly in combination and used especially in pipes, cable sheaths, batteries, solder, and shields against radioactivity — see element table
2
a :  a plummet for sounding at sea
b plural British :  a usually flat lead roof
c plural :  lead framing for panes in windows
d :  a thin strip of metal used to separate lines of type in printing
3
a :  a thin stick of marking substance (as graphite) in or for a pencil
b :  white lead
5
lead·less \-ləs\ adjective

Origin of LEAD

Middle English leed, from Old English lēad; akin to Middle High German lōt lead
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Metals and Metallurgy Terms

assay, bloom, bullion, ductile, ingot, malleable, patina, plate, temper, tensile

5lead

verb \ˈled\

Definition of LEAD

transitive verb
1
:  to cover, line, or weight with lead (see 4lead)
2
:  to fix (window glass) in position with leads
3
:  to put space between the lines of (typeset matter)
4
:  to treat or mix with lead or a lead compound <leaded gasoline>

Origin of LEAD

(see 4lead)
First Known Use: 14th century

Other Building Terms

batten, cistern, hearth, lath, transom, wainscot

lead

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Metallic chemical element, chemical symbol Pb, atomic number 82. Lead is a soft, silvery white or grayish, malleable, ductile, dense metal that conducts electricity poorly. Its stable isotopes are all end products of radioactive decay of uranium and other heavy elements. Known since ancient times, lead is so durable and resistant to corrosion that Roman lead pipes are still usable. Lead is used in roofing, as cable coverings, and in pipes, conduits, and structures. Other uses are in storage batteries, ammunition, and low-melting-point alloys (e.g., solder, pewter) and as shielding against sound, vibrations, and radiation. Lead is rarely found free in nature; its major ore is the sulfide galena (PbS). Because it and its compounds are poisons (see lead poisoning), lead-based paints and gasoline additives have been phased out in many countries. Lead in compounds has valence 2 and 4; an oxide (litharge, PbO) is the most widely used. Lead compounds are added to lead crystal (see glass), glazes, and ceramics and are used as pigments, drying agents for paints and varnishes, insecticides and herbicides, and fireproofing agents and in matches, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Almost half of all lead is recovered from recycled scrap. The “lead” in pencils is graphite.

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