garden

7 ENTRIES FOUND:

1gar·den

noun \ˈgär-dən\

: an area of ground where plants (such as flowers or vegetables) are grown

: a public area with many plants and trees

: a large stadium or building for sports or entertainment

Full Definition of GARDEN

1
a :  a plot of ground where herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables are cultivated
b :  a rich well-cultivated region
c :  a container (as a window box) planted with usually a variety of small plants
2
a :  a public recreation area or park usually ornamented with plants and trees <a botanical garden>
b :  an open-air eating or drinking place
c :  a large hall for public entertainment
gar·den·ful \-ˌfl\ noun

Examples of GARDEN

  1. We planted a small garden in our backyard.
  2. They were sitting out in the back garden.

Origin of GARDEN

Middle English gardin, from Anglo-French gardin, jardin, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German gart enclosure — more at yard
First Known Use: 13th century

Other Agriculture/Gardening Terms

fallow, graft, heirloom, loam, potash, soilage, swath, tilth, windfall

Rhymes with GARDEN

2garden

verb

: to work in a garden : to take care of the plants in a garden

gar·denedgar·den·ing \ˈgär-də-niŋ, ˈgärd-niŋ\

Full Definition of GARDEN

intransitive verb
:  to lay out or work in a garden
transitive verb
1
:  to make into a garden
2
:  to ornament with gardens
gar·den·er \ˈgär-də-nər, ˈgärd-nər\ noun

First Known Use of GARDEN

1577

Other Agriculture/Gardening Terms

fallow, graft, heirloom, loam, potash, soilage, swath, tilth, windfall

Rhymes with GARDEN

3garden

adjective

Definition of GARDEN

1
:  of, relating to, used in, or frequenting a garden
2
a :  of a kind grown in the open as distinguished from one more delicate <garden plant>
b :  commonly found :  garden-variety

First Known Use of GARDEN

15th century

Other Agriculture/Gardening Terms

fallow, graft, heirloom, loam, potash, soilage, swath, tilth, windfall

garden

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Plot of ground where herbs, fruits, flowers, vegetables, or trees are cultivated. The earliest surviving detailed garden plan is Egyptian and dates from about 1400 BC; it shows tree-lined avenues and rectangular ponds. Mesopotamian gardens were places where shade and cool water could be enjoyed; Hellenistic gardens were conspicuously luxurious in their display of precious materials, a tradition carried over by Byzantine gardens. Islamic gardens made use of water, often in pools and fed by narrow canals resembling irrigation channels. In Renaissance Europe, gardens reflected confidence in human ability to impose order on the external world; Italian gardens emphasized the unity of house and garden. French 17th-century gardens were rigidly symmetrical, and French cultural dominance in Europe popularized this style into the next century. In 18th-century England, increasing awareness of the natural world led to the development of “natural” gardens that made use of irregular, nonsymmetrical layouts. Chinese gardens have generally harmonized with the natural landscape, and have employed rocks gathered from great distances as a universal decorative feature. Early Japanese gardens imitated Chinese principles; later developments were the abstract garden, which might feature only sand and rocks, and miniature gardens made in trays (see bonsai).

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