fungus

61 ENTRIES FOUND:

fun·gus

noun, often attributive \ˈfəŋ-gəs\

: any one of a group of related plants (such as molds, mushrooms, or yeasts) that have no flowers and that live on dead or decaying things

plural fun·gi \ˈfən-ˌjī, ˈfəŋ-ˌgī\ also fun·gus·es \ˈfəŋ-gə-səz\

Full Definition of FUNGUS

:  any of a kingdom (Fungi) of saprophytic and parasitic spore-producing eukaryotic typically filamentous organisms formerly classified as plants that lack chlorophyll and include molds, rusts, mildews, smuts, mushrooms, and yeasts

Origin of FUNGUS

Latin
First Known Use: 1527

Rhymes with FUNGUS

fun·gus

noun , often attrib \ˈfəŋ-gəs\   (Medical Dictionary)
plural fun·gi \ˈfən-ˌalso ˈfəŋ-ˌgī\ also fun·gus·es \ˈfəŋ-gə-səz\

Medical Definition of FUNGUS

1
: any of the kingdom Fungi of saprophytic and parasitic spore-producing eukaryotic typically filamentous organisms formerly classified as plants that lack chlorophyll and include molds, rusts, mildews, smuts, mushrooms, and yeasts
2
: infection with a fungus

fungus

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Bracket fungus (Polyporus) growing on wood.—H.S. Knighton

Any of about 80,000 known species of organisms belonging to the kingdom Fungi, including yeasts, rusts, smuts, molds, mushrooms, and mildews. Though formerly classified as plants, fungi lack chlorophyll and the organized plant structures of stems, roots, and leaves. The thallus, or body, of a typical fungus consists of a mycelium through which cytoplasm flows. The mycelium generally reproduces by forming spores, either directly or in special fruiting bodies that make up the visible part of a fungus. The soil provides an ideal habitat for many species, although fungi can also live in the air and water and on plants and animals. Fungi are found in all regions of the world that have sufficient moisture to enable them to grow. Lacking chlorophyll, fungi are unable to carry out photosynthesis and must obtain nutrients by secreting enzymes onto the surface on which they are growing. These enzymes digest organic matter, forming solutions of nutrients that can be absorbed through the mycelium. Decomposition of organic matter by fungi results in the release of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus into the soil or the atmosphere. Essential to many food and industrial processes, fungi are used in the production of enzymes, organic acids, vitamins, and antibiotics. Fungi can also destroy crops, cause diseases in humans (e.g., candidiasis and ringworm), and ruin clothing and food with mildew and rot. Parasitic fungi invade living organisms, often causing disease and death (see parasitism), whereas other fungi establish symbiotic relationships with algae (forming lichens), plants (forming mycorrhizae; see mycorrhiza), and certain insects.

Browse

Next Word in the Dictionary: fungused
Previous Word in the Dictionary: fungous
All Words Near: fungus

Seen & Heard

What made you want to look up fungus? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

Get Our Free Apps
Voice Search, Favorites,
Word of the Day, and More
Join Us on FB & Twitter
Get the Word of the Day and More