from

25 ENTRIES FOUND:

from

preposition \ˈfrəm, ˈfräm also fəm\

—used to indicate the starting point of a physical movement or action

—used to indicate the place that something comes out of

—used to indicate the place where someone lives or was born

Full Definition of FROM

1
a —used as a function word to indicate a starting point of a physical movement or a starting point in measuring or reckoning or in a statement of limits <came here from the city> <a week from today> <cost from $5 to $10>
b —used as a function word to indicate the starting or focal point of an activity <called me from a pay phone> <ran a business from her home>
2
—used as a function word to indicate physical separation or an act or condition of removal, abstention, exclusion, release, subtraction, or differentiation <protection from the sun> <relief from anxiety>
3
—used as a function word to indicate the source, cause, agent, or basis <we conclude from this> <a call from my lawyer> <inherited a love of music from his father> <worked hard from necessity>

Origin of FROM

Middle English, from Old English from, fram; akin to Old High German fram, adverb, forth, away, Old English faran to go — more at fare
First Known Use: before 12th century

Rhymes with FROM

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