frog

63 ENTRIES FOUND:

frog

noun \ˈfrg, ˈfräg\

Definition of FROG

1
:  any of various largely aquatic leaping anuran amphibians (as ranids) that have slender bodies with smooth moist skin and strong long hind legs with webbed feet — compare toad
2
:  the triangular elastic horny pad in the middle of the sole of the foot of a horse — see hoof illustration
3
a :  a loop attached to a belt to hold a weapon or tool
b :  an ornamental braiding for fastening the front of a garment that consists of a button and a loop through which it passes
4
often capitalized usually offensive :  frenchman
5
:  a device permitting the wheels on one rail of a track to cross an intersecting rail
6
:  a condition in the throat that produces hoarseness <had a frog in his throat>
7
:  the nut of a violin bow
8
:  a small holder (as of metal, glass, or plastic) with perforations or spikes for holding flowers in place in a bowl or vase

Origin of FROG

Middle English frogge, from Old English frogga; akin to Old High German frosk frog; senses 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 unclearly derived & perhaps of distinct origin
First Known Use: before 12th century

Rhymes with FROG

frog

noun \ˈfrg, ˈfräg\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of FROG

1
: any of various smooth-skinned web-footed largely aquatic tailless agile leaping amphibians (as of the suborder Diplasiocoela)
2
: the triangular elastic horny pad in the middle of the sole of the foot of a horse
3
: a condition in the throat that produces hoarseness <had a frog in his throat>

Illustration of FROG

frog

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Costa Rican flying tree frog (Agalychnis spurrelli).—Heather Angel

Any of various tailless amphibians in the order Anura. The name may be limited to any member of the family Ranidae (true frogs); more broadly, it often distinguishes smooth-skinned, leaping anurans from squat, warty, hopping ones (toads). Frogs generally have protruding eyes, strong, webbed hind feet adapted for leaping and swimming, and smooth, moist skin. Most are predominantly aquatic, but some live on land. They range in length (snout to anus) from 0.4 to 12 in. (9.8 mm–30 cm). Though frogs have poisonous skin glands, they rely on camouflage for protection from predators. Most eat insects and other small arthropods or worms, but several also eat other frogs, rodents, and reptiles. They usually breed in freshwater, where they lay eggs that hatch into tadpoles. Since 1989 researchers have become increasingly alarmed by striking declines in frog populations worldwide, suspected to be linked to climatic factors or a fungal disease.

Browse

Next Word in the Dictionary: frogbit
Previous Word in the Dictionary: FROF
All Words Near: frog

Seen & Heard

What made you want to look up frog? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).