ethnography


eth·nog·ra·phy

noun \eth-ˈnä-grə-fē\

: the study of human races and cultures

Full Definition of ETHNOGRAPHY

:  the study and systematic recording of human cultures; also :  a descriptive work produced from such research
eth·nog·ra·pher \-fər\ noun
eth·no·graph·ic \ˌeth-nə-ˈgra-fik\ or eth·no·graph·i·cal \-fi-kəl\ adjective
eth·no·graph·i·cal·ly \-fi-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

Origin of ETHNOGRAPHY

French ethnographie, from ethno- + -graphie -graphy
First Known Use: 1834

Other Anthropology Terms

ectomorph, prehistory, yurt

eth·nog·ra·phy

noun \eth-ˈnäg-rə-fē\   (Medical Dictionary)
plural eth·nog·ra·phies

Medical Definition of ETHNOGRAPHY

: the study and systematic recording of human cultures; also : a descriptive work produced from such research
eth·no·graph·ic \ˌeth-nə-ˈgraf-ik\ or eth·no·graph·i·cal \-i-kəl\ adjective
eth·no·graph·i·cal·ly \-i-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

ethnography

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Descriptive study of a particular human society. Contemporary ethnography is based almost entirely on fieldwork. The ethnographer lives among the people who are the subject of study for a year or more, learning the local language and participating in everyday life while striving to maintain a degree of objective detachment. He or she usually cultivates close relationships with “informants” who can provide specific information on aspects of cultural life. While detailed written notes are the mainstay of fieldwork, ethnographers may also use tape recorders, cameras, or video recorders. Contemporary ethnographies have both influenced and been influenced by literary theory. See also Bronislaw Malinowski; cultural anthropology.

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