entropy


en·tro·py

noun \ˈen-trə-pē\
plural en·tro·pies

Definition of ENTROPY

1
:  a measure of the unavailable energy in a closed thermodynamic system that is also usually considered to be a measure of the system's disorder, that is a property of the system's state, and that varies directly with any reversible change in heat in the system and inversely with the temperature of the system; broadly :  the degree of disorder or uncertainty in a system
2
a :  the degradation of the matter and energy in the universe to an ultimate state of inert uniformity
b :  a process of degradation or running down or a trend to disorder
3
en·tro·pic \en-ˈtrō-pik, -ˈträ-pik\ adjective
en·tro·pi·cal·ly \-pi-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

Origin of ENTROPY

International Scientific Vocabulary 2en- + Greek tropē change, literally, turn, from trepein to turn
First Known Use: 1875

Other Chemical Engineering Terms

alkali, cation, decant, hygroscopic, isotope, oxidize, slurry, solute, viscous

en·tro·py

noun \ˈen-trə-pē\   (Medical Dictionary)
plural en·tro·pies

Medical Definition of ENTROPY

: a measure of the unavailable energy in a closed thermodynamic system that is also usually considered to be a measure of the system's disorder and that is a property of the system's state and is related to it in such a manner that a reversible change in heat in the system produces a change in the measure which varies directly with the heat change and inversely with the absolute temperature at which the change takes place; broadly : the degree of disorder or uncertainty in a system
en·tro·pic \en-ˈtrōp-ik, -ˈträp-\ adjective
en·tro·pi·cal·ly \-i-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

entropy

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Measure of a system's energy that is unavailable for work, or of the degree of a system's disorder. When heat is added to a system held at constant temperature, the change in entropy is related to the change in energy, the pressure, the temperature, and the change in volume. Its magnitude varies from zero to the total amount of energy in a system. The concept, first proposed in 1850 by the German physicist Rudolf Clausius (1822–1888), is sometimes presented as the second law of thermodynamics, which states that entropy increases during irreversible processes such as spontaneous mixing of hot and cold gases, uncontrolled expansion of a gas into a vacuum, and combustion of fuel. In popular, nontechnical use, entropy is regarded as a measure of the chaos or randomness of a system.

Browse

Next Word in the Dictionary: entruck
Previous Word in the Dictionary: entropion
All Words Near: entropy

Seen & Heard

What made you want to look up entropy? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).