entire


1en·tire

adjective \in-ˈtī(-ə)r, ˈen-ˌ\

: complete or full : not lacking or leaving out any part

Full Definition of ENTIRE

1
:  having no element or part left out :  whole <was alone the entire day>
2
:  complete in degree :  total <their entire devotion to their family>
3
a :  consisting of one piece
b :  homogeneous, unmixed
c :  intact <strove to keep the collection entire>
4
:  not castrated
5
:  having the margin continuous or free from indentations <an entire leaf>
entire adverb
en·tire·ness noun

Examples of ENTIRE

  1. The war affected an entire generation of young Americans.
  2. The fence runs along the entire length of the building.
  3. She has dedicated her entire life to helping others.

Origin of ENTIRE

Middle English enter, entier, entire, from Anglo-French enter, entier, from Latin integer, literally, untouched, from in- + tangere to touch — more at tangent
First Known Use: 14th century

2entire

noun

Definition of ENTIRE

1
archaic :  the whole :  entirety
2
:  stallion

First Known Use of ENTIRE

1597

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