creosote


1cre·o·sote

noun \ˈkrē-ə-ˌsōt\

: a brown, oily liquid used to keep wood from rotting

Full Definition of CREOSOTE

1
:  a clear or yellowish flammable oily liquid mixture of phenolic compounds obtained by the distillation of tar derived from wood and especially from beech wood
2
:  a brownish oily liquid consisting chiefly of aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by distillation of coal tar and used especially as a wood preservative
3
:  a dark brown or black flammable tar deposited from especially wood smoke on the walls of a chimney

Origin of CREOSOTE

German Kreosot, from Greek kreas flesh + sōtēr preserver, from sōzein to preserve, from sōs safe (probably akin to Sanskrit tavīti he is strong); from its antiseptic properties — more at raw
First Known Use: 1835

2creosote

verb
creosot·edcreosot·ing

Definition of CREOSOTE

transitive verb
:  to treat with creosote

First Known Use of CREOSOTE

1836

cre·o·sote

noun \ˈkrē-ə-ˌsōt\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of CREOSOTE

1
: a clear or yellowish flammable oily liquid mixture of phenolic compounds obtained by the distillation of wood tar especially from beech wood and used especially as a disinfectant and as an expectorant in chronic bronchitis
2
: a brownish oily liquid consisting chiefly of aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by distillation of coal tar and used especially as a wood preservative

creosote

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Either of two entirely different substances, distilled from coal tar or wood tar. Coal-tar creosote is a complex mixture of organic compounds, largely hydrocarbons. It is a cheap water-insoluble wood preservative used for railroad ties, telephone poles, and marine pier pilings and as a disinfectant, fungicide, and biocide. Wood-tar creosote consists mainly of phenols and related compounds and was once widely used for pharmaceutical purposes.

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